75 Years of Excellence: Technology evolves

Rodney Davis, Vernard Eller and Chuck Davis, members of the 1947 Campus Times staff, set type for an issue of the paper. / photo courtesy of ULV Archives
Rodney Davis, Vernard Eller and Chuck Davis, members of the 1947 Campus Times staff, set type for an issue of the paper. / photo courtesy of ULV Archives

by Bridget M. Rohrer
Staff Writer

Since 1919, the Campus Times has gone through a number of changes. Over the years, there have been multitudes of technological advancements within the communications industry and the Campus Times has always kept up with the trends with enthusiasm and interest.

According to previous staffers, the Campus Times has had its share of tough times. From reporting the news when the technology wouldn’t allow for timeliness in the ‘20s, to lack of finances in the ‘30s, lack of interest during the war years, the struggles in the ‘70s with adapting to electric typewriters, the computer rage in the ‘80s and desktop publishing in the ‘90s; the paper has seen it all.

“The paper has been very good at staying in line with the technology,” said Dr. George Keeler, associate professor of journalism.

Former editor in chief Chuck Davis (‘47) worked on the paper 1941-43 and again in 1946-47. He enjoyed the printing aspect of the paper and even started his own business. He, too, saw a great number of technological changes made through the years.

“We have always been able to turn people out [into the work force] who are qualified because we stay up to date with the technology,” said Dr. Keeler.

Photography staff members (l to r) Brian Murphy, Ary Farajollahi and Amy Borer gather around some of the current tools of the publishing trade. / photo by Jeff Leard
Photography staff members (l to r) Brian Murphy, Ary Farajollahi and Amy Borer gather around some of the current tools of the publishing trade. / photo by Jeff Leard

“The acid etching process and mounting the paper on a flatbed press was on its way out in the ‘70s,” said Al Lalane, former journalism professor and current assistant in the academic affairs office. “So much more could be done when we didn’t have to lock everything into right angles and could use an offset printing press.”

These days, the newspaper industry has advanced far beyond this and the Campus Times has kept pace. The paper now uses eight Macintosh computers with the trade’s latest programs, including Quark XPress, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, that make the publication timely and elegant. However, back in 1937 and ‘38, a Ditto Master was being used to print the minimum news.

“In 1976, the paper invested in 10 electric typewriters and became the envy of the secretaries,” recalls Dr. Keeler. “The students’ equipment was equal to the staff’s.

“We have everything that professional publications have. We are a professional publication,” said Dr. Keeler.

Since its start in 1919, the Campus Times has changed a great deal. Format changes have been made, writing styles and rules have evolved, printing processes and the interests of the readers has changed; but it is still the Campus Times.

“The rules of our profession are old but our way of doing our profession (printing a paper) is new,” said Dr. Keeler.

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