ULV publications showcase talent

Sophomore psychology major Elizabeth Santilena (right), with the help of adviser Carol Fetty, sorts through 132 short stories, essays, poems, photographs and drawings before making the final cut for the spring issue of Prism. Fetty says the work includes a large number of entries from the La Verne prison program and will be out this May. Prism and La Vernácula are two on-campus publications offering students a creative outlet. / photo by Rosie Sinapi
Sophomore psychology major Elizabeth Santilena (right), with the help of adviser Carol Fetty, sorts through 132 short stories, essays, poems, photographs and drawings before making the final cut for the spring issue of Prism. Fetty says the work includes a large number of entries from the La Verne prison program and will be out this May. Prism and La Vernácula are two on-campus publications offering students a creative outlet. / photo by Rosie Sinapi

by Erica Aguilar
Staff Writer

In Prism and La Vernácula, the two magazines considered to be the voice of ULV, pictures of beauty and words of wisdom are captured in photographs, poems, short stories and art by members of the University community.

Prism is the literary magazine of the University of La Verne. It is published twice a year, in the fall and spring.

For two consecutive years, Carol Fetty, professor of English, has been the adviser of Prism. She has been involved with the magazine since it was first published in 1977, and acted as the first editor in chief of Prism.

“We have tried to improve the magazine so that all the students will be proud of it. Students who aren’t English or journalism majors and have the talent to write can have their work recognized,” said Fetty.

Other people involved with Prism are Gary Colby, associate professor of photography and junior Aaron Gogley, director of advertising management.

While judging Prism submissions, the editorial board never knows who writes the works submitted to the magazine. Once a work is submitted to Prism, the author or artist’s name is covered or removed. The pieces remain anonymous until the final cuts are made and the students are informed that their work has been selected for publication.

Prism is a free publication paid for by the English Department. It is distributed throughout campus.

Another popular on-campus publication is La Vernácula. Like Prism, La Vernácula publishes short stories, photography, art and poetry. However, La Vernácula focuses entirely on Latino themes and issues. Now in its 14th year, it is the Latino literary magazine of ULV.

La Vernácula is published at the end of both the fall and spring semesters. The size of the magazine has quadrupled since last year, but it does not contain any color.

Editor in chief, senior Jesus Luna said, “We are going to try and get a colorful issue this semester, but with limited funds, it is not a promise.”

Luna has been the editor in chief of La Vernácula for three semesters. The magazine does not have an editorial board, due to the small number of people involved with the magazine.

Junior co-editor Norma Alvarez said, “It’s a lot of hard work being co-editor of the magazine, but when the final product is finished, I get this great feeling of satisfaction.”

Dr. Andrea Labinger, adviser and professor of Spanish, “uses funds from the Spanish Department to put the magazine together. That is why it focuses on Latino themes,” said Luna.

“I have been writing poetry since the 8th grade and I want to have my work printed and published as often as possible,” said senior DiShawn Givens, who submits work to both magazines.

“When I see someone or something that touches me, I have to write about it. I write poetry to survive,” said Givens of her inspiration to write.

“I’m hopeful that the magazine will continue to grow and future students will keep it alive,” Luna said.

The deadline for submissions to La Vernácula is Monday, and entries may be placed in ULV Box 124. The deadline to submit forms to Prism was last month. All entries are free.

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