Letters to the Editor

General Education

Dear Editor,

I would like to respond to the Rob Strauss column in last week’s Campus Times [“Restructuring of requirements needed,” Oct. 10]. Rob challenges the appropriateness of Fitness for Life being a general education requirement. Most institutions of higher learning including Pomona College and Caltech have a physical education requirement that must be fulfilled for graduation. Educated people know the benefits of physical fitness and the necessity for it. If everyone in our society were physically fit and practiced good health habits we probably would not need such a class as Fitness for Life. The reality is that we have more obese people with poor health habits than any developed nation. It does not matter what your area of expertise is, if you are not physically fit nor have a healthy life style you will not be as productive in your work. I know of no job that doesn’t require energy. Statistics are evident in many publications proving that people perform their jobs at a higher rate of efficiency, are more energetic, sick less, live longer, and if those aren’t compelling enough reasons, have a better and more active sex life if they are physically fit. In a society that appears to becoming more pressurized, it is important that all people learn the benefits of a healthful existence. Our challenge in Fitness for Life is to educate our students about their bodies and the benefits of a proper exercise and recreation program.

I know this goes against what many students think, but the truth is most students do not know what is best for them. If it were up to the students to decide, we probably would not have College Algebra or other specific courses as general education requirements. I have heard many students ask why they have to have this or that course. They do not see a need for it in their chosen profession. Many benefits of general education courses are realized well after graduation. You will be amazed how often you will draw from the knowledge acquired in courses outside your major. I encourage students to acknowledge the wisdom of those who have researched general education and trust in their judgement.

Rex Huigens
Chair, Department of Movement and Sports Science

 

Dear Editor,

We could not agree more with what Rob Strauss said in his article “Restructuring of requirements needed” on Oct. 10. He wrote about the, in his opinion, frivolous requirements, such as PE 001 and U 100.

U100 classes are mostly pointless and discuss topics that we are already familiar with. Papers that are given are just busy work and very low on the priority scale; students would rather write papers for more important classes. Also, many students choose not to attend the useless sessions. To top it all, it is a CRD/NO CRD class and will have to be retaken if NO CRD is given. It really should be optional for students.

PE 001, Fitness for Life, is another requirement that should be reevaluated. Going to class twice a week for fifty minutes each time is not going to make you healthy. Most students, if not all, know what is healthy and what is not, and have chosen to follow these ideals or not. Many people would not mind being physically fit, but what they do mind is the time and effort that has to be invested.

In conclusion, these classes should not be part of our graduate requirements.

Administrators should take the time to observe these classes. Maybe the they will understand and revoke these classes’ requirements status.

Mike Auklin
Freshman
Kyle Young
Freshman
Maria Jimenez
Freshman

 

School Spirit

Dear Editor,

In regard to the opinions article written by Andrea Gardner on Oct. 10, 1997, “ULV should bleed orange, green,” we agree with the concept to organize a spirit club in order to increase unity in a school that lacks spirit. We also feel that there are many other ways to raise school morale and participation; for example, better publicity. Many students and faculty are not aware of scheduled games. No flyers are made, no posters are posted, not even word of mouth in order to inform our students and faculty to get out and get involved. To most instructors, fall convocation is an event they include in their lesson plan giving extra credit to those who attend, making convocation one of the most attended gatherings, next to graduation. If only the same emphasis was placed on sports maybe our school would become more spirited. Although these are only a few examples, there are many more that can contribute to a united spirited campus.

Eliza Amanat
Junior
Jason Flick
Senior
Nathan Swift
Freshman
Vladimira Chavez
Sophomore
Melissa Mijares
Freshman

 

Commuter Involvement

Dear Editor,

As a commuter student, I wish to comment on Scott Harvey’s column “Campus life leads to separatism,” from your Oct. 3 issue. I feel that Scott has raised several important issues which must be faced by both commuter and on-campus students. College life is not just about the classes one takes, it’s about the friendships you make and organizations you become involved in. Both sides need to make an effort to come together and build on the resources that each brings to our community.

Commuter students should not blame only the on-campus students for this situation; we are also part of the problem. We tend to come to school only for our classes. We leave as soon as we can so that we can go about our own lives, off-campus. How many of us check our mail-boxes when we come to campus? There is important information that comes into those boxes. Do we take the time to find out about clubs, organizations or sports events that we can make? Ask yourself these questions, and think about your answers.

I, for one, refuse to let the organizations be for only on-campus students. I want to be a part of this community. So, I got involved in the Associated Students Federation, Circle K, the Honors Society and much more. I make the effort, how about you?

Michael Morrow
Junior

 

La Verne Gangs

Dear Editor,

In response to the article “Graffiti marks LV gangs’ territory,” by Araceli Esparza [Oct. 10], we found this article to be very informative. Not too many students are aware of gang problems here in La Verne. The article was very intriguing and interesting; we immediately liked your article.

The article seemed to be very valid because of the research put into it. It’s nice to know that your facts about gangs were validated by Sergeant Rick Aragon. What was also interesting was the history of these gangs. We were surprised that one gang has been around for thirty years.

This article has made it apparent to many students to be cautious at night on and off campus. The article may save someone from harm because no longer can ignorance be an excuse from gang violence, now we know. Gang violence and graffiti are increasing very fast and its good to see people help to try to reduce it.

Juan Gonzalez
Junior
Kevin Gustafson
Freshman
Stephanie Coleman
Freshman
Sergio Alfaro
Senior

 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Dear Editor,

This letter is not in response to the false allegations brought forth toward Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE). Instead, this letter is to express our concern for our former fraternity brother Dale Schroeder [“Allegations against fraternity under investigation,” Oct. 10], and possible others like him.

On Sept. 7, 1997, Schroeder was brought up on the charge of “unbecoming of a gentleman.” The specific charges which he was alleged of consisted of the following: substance abuse and distribution, along with sexual harassment and misconduct. These allegations were brought to our attention by concerned La Verne students. Our investigation and trial found these allegations to be valid.

According to SAE International Fraternity laws (Title IX, Article 49, section 165), anyone found guilty of violating our national code of conduct shall and must be expelled. Therefore, we expelled Schroeder on Sept. 28, 1997.

We apologize to the numerous individuals who were affected by his misconduct. Our concern is that there are many others who display the same behavior throughout campus. The abuse of drugs, sexual harassment and misconduct are behaviors that have unfortunately become widespread throughout college society.

We encourage organizations, individuals, faculty and the public to try to tackle these issues. We feel that we have taken a step to alleviate these inappropriate behaviors; as in the case with Schroeder. These behaviors are by no means acceptable to SAE, nor are they conducive to today’s society or college community.

In conclusion, we would like to thank those individuals who tried to provide help and guidance for our then-brother in need. As a chapter, we offer our continued support and concern for the well-being of Dale Schroeder.

The Brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon

 

Rush

Dear Editor,

It has occurred to us that in your Oct. 10, 1997 copy of the Campus Times; the article entitled “Rush comes up short,” was confusing in the point the writer was trying to get across. Was the writer trying to convey that students should “go Greek” or they should choose not to be a part of the Greek system? She writes that the low turnout of students rushing is a disappointment and that more undergraduates should rush, but then she goes on to give many negative examples of why one shouldn’t join. This is what really seemed to confuse us; if she is trying to convince people to rush, why would she write all of these negative comments without writing what the Greeks have to offer?

Perhaps the writer could have used interviews to back up her opinion. Why didn’t she interview people who didn’t choose to rush, and find out why? She could have also done a complementary interview of a Greek member stating why one should rush. For instance she states, “It may not be right to judge all Greek organizations on a few instances, but regardless, a negative image of Greeks has sparked from previous years.” First of all, she writes about this negative image, and the way people judge the Greek organization, but never shows any proof, such as an interview, to show this. Many people do not feel that the Greeks have a bad image. Secondly, each year should be a new start; she should forget the past and encourage a positive future.

Amy Morrison
Freshman
Dereck Dedeaux
Junior
Maria Branca
Freshman
Amber Powell
Freshman
Adrian Bean
Sophomore

 

Dear Editor,

Many campuses across the nation have a well established Greek system in place. On many large campuses, it becomes one of the few ways to feel you belong and to stand out amongst the massive student body. On such campuses the Greek system, aids in the development of school spirit. Those who are participants become more involved and there is a sense of pride which comes with their achievements. The members then, in turn, put on activities which promote school pride for the rest of the student body.

On smaller campuses, however, the idea of a Greek system becomes almost senseless. At La Verne, for instance, we don’t really have a large enough student body to support a Greek system. We have only two fraternities and only one of these has a house. Many of the reasons to join a fraternity or sorority do not apply at the University of La Verne. For instance, on such a small campus it is much easier to enforce limitation placed on these organizations. We believe that this campus is just too small to support a solid Greek system.

Shannon Johnson
Freshman
Michael Campopiano
Freshman
J.T. Hawthorne
Freshman
Laura Duckworth
Freshman
Zandy Chinte
Freshman

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