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Depending on oneself not only solution

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Julia Carachure, Assistant Managing Editor

Julia Carachure, Assistant Managing Editor

For all those times you stood by me;
For all the truth that you made me see;
For all the joy you brought to my life;
For all the wrong that you made right;
For every dream you made come true….

Oops! I am sorry, that was the beginning of my Celine Dion column. I will proceed to write about what I will be talking about.

All my life, my mother made me feel that if I had any problems in my life, I should keep them all to myself. There was no such thing as confiding in anyone, so if I had a problem, I was the only one who had to deal with it. So for the longest time, I was very emotionally closed up.

At 15, that attitude led me into trouble, I ended up falling in love with someone who I never should have. There was no one who I could go to for advice when it came to that guy. I certainly could not tell my mother about my guy problems. I carried my own burdens alone and because of this, I had problems that I could not reveal to anyone, and as a result, I made sure I trusted no one.

But all of that changed at 17, when I met my best friend, Philip Escobedo. Through him, I learned to confide in others, I learned to let go of pain and know the true meaning of friendship as well as to be open about some of my problems and that friends are there to listen and be there for me when I needed them.

When I was 19, I had to deal with severe depression, among other problems. That year, I met four individuals at La Verne who taught me that it is OK to admit that if I have a problem that I am not able to handle on my own, that I can ask for help when I need it and not feel embarrassed about it, and that carrying my burdens alone is not always an option. Thanks to Danny Craig, Laura Lopez, Manny Escalante and Sergio Velazquez, it was through you guys that I realized that I should never be ashamed of admitting that I can’t do things alone and that there are people who do care about me, even if they don’t know me that well, who will help me.

Then at the age of 20, I met some strange and yet wonderful friends, who have proven to me time and time again that they will stand by me no matter what happens to me. My roommate Kirsten and my other buddies, Nathan, Steve and Andrea have taught me to have fun and that friendship is indeed a strong bond. I know that I have no problem picking up the phone and telling them that I have a problem. Thanks guys, I am so glad that you all are part of my life.

One important lesson that I have learned is that I never realized until now how important I am to people around me. I have always been made to feel that if I were to die the next day, no one would care, other than my family. Now at the age of 21, I realize that there are people out there who love me and care about me. There are people out there who will listen to me and offer advice if I need it. I have people who are willing to offer me a hand when I need one.

When I think back on how much I have changed these past six years, I can’t believe how strong of a person I have become. Thanks to the people that have come in and out of my life, I have been able to open up to people, I am able to talk to people more easily, and I have been able to relax and have fun.

Thank you for helping me become a strong person, as Celine Dion would say, “Because You Loved Me.” I know that I will have no problem expressing any needs that I may have later on in the future. I know I can count on someone to be there.

Julia Carachure, a junior journalism major, is assistant managing editor of the Campus Times. She can be reached by e-mail at carachur@ulv.edu.

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