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Fuller foments emotion in his work

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by Gianina Lomedico
Staff Writer

Montana, California and other parts of the Southwest came alive in the watercolor paintings of James Fuller’s “Mountains and Rocks” on Tuesday, Feb. 27. At 5 p.m., professors, students and art lovers enjoyed a lecture from Fuller that detailed his work and the process of how he eventually put it into context.

Fuller is professor emeritus at Scripps College in Claremont where he taught from 1967-1996. His simple works of art are made in a watercolor medium that artists use for qualities of nature. Light and shadows are then produced by the elements. Layers of color are used to create the image.

Many of Fuller’s works were made on-site and some large rock paintings were made from arrangements in his studio.

Fuller explained his art in its simple form. “My paintings are organized visual forms that correspond to a reaction from a subject. It’s not a copy of a subject, but of transformed order.” Fuller also wanted students to learn from his art.

“I want people to learn how colors interact and how forms are organized and respond to nature.”

Professor of Art Ruth Trotter, organized the event that opened Feb. 16 and will continue until April 6.

“It has been a real pleasure to have James Fuller come. It is a good lesson for the students at University of La Verne,” said Trotter.

Trotter then explained about the lecture and the gallery exhibits. “I liked how he gave the secrets about his art. I liked everything.”

Freshman Danielle Cummins commented on what she enjoyed about the event. “I liked listening to the journey through his life and until now. I’ve never seen paintings of rocks. They were very unique,” she said.

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