ULV requests more time for annex

Built in 2000 as a temporary solution to the lack of space on campus during renovation of the Hoover Building, the Hoover Annex will remain in place for at least another year. Serving as office space for the Office of Institutional Technology, the five modules will also hold 103 classes during the fall 2001 semester. / photo by Peter Schupmann
Built in 2000 as a temporary solution to the lack of space on campus during renovation of the Hoover Building, the Hoover Annex will remain in place for at least another year. Serving as office space for the Office of Institutional Technology, the five modules will also hold 103 classes during the fall 2001 semester. / photo by Peter Schupmann

by Joe Garcia III
Staff Writer

University of La Verne officials have requested that the city allow the Hoover Annex, a temporary classroom facility, to stand for at least one more year.

ULV, which has grown in recent years, is currently dealing with a shortage of facilities and overcrowding, said Lisa Meyer, the University’s dean of admissions.

The University has plenty of land to accommodate recent growth, but needs to build permanent buildings, Meyer said.

Several new buildings, including the arts and communications building on D Street and the law school in Ontario have been converted or constructed recently.

There is still a need for temporary structures, according to Meyers.

As far as the Hoover Annex, ULV Vice President Phil Hawkey said, there is a good chance the university will ask the city for another year’s extension on Hoover’s permits.

Meanwhile, ULV students don’t seem to mind their temporary quarters.

In fact they say the university has done a good job integrating the modular units into the campus environment.

Student Jason Cortez said as long as he receives the education he has come to expect from the University it doesn’t matter what building he is being taught in.

With landscaping, such as shrubbery, flowers and shady trees, La Verne resident Frances Gomez said the building is aesthetically pleasing.

When permanent classroom space is available the appropriate buildings constructed, the modular units will be removed and the site will be returned to the knoll that it once was, officials said.

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