ULV women sold on ‘Foxy Boxing’

Sophomore Sarah Hoisington challenged Foxy Boxing title holder Amber Clayton Thursday night at Jerico's Mile. Clayton defended her title with a 26-30, 28-30, 28-30 win over Hoisington. The match marked the sixth week of the promotion "Thursday Night Fight Night" at the Upland sports bar. / photo by Liz Lucsko
Sophomore Sarah Hoisington challenged Foxy Boxing title holder Amber Clayton Thursday night at Jerico’s Mile. Clayton defended her title with a 26-30, 28-30, 28-30 win over Hoisington. The match marked the sixth week of the promotion “Thursday Night Fight Night” at the Upland sports bar. / photo by Liz Lucsko

by Brian Ortega
Staff Writer

Boxing anyone? Sorry gentleman. Take a seat, this event is just for the ladies. The “Foxy Boxing” craze has swept through the University of La Verne female population.

Every Thursday night for the past seven weeks, women from ULV have taken center stage in female boxing.

“We normally have four fights with the last one being the championship fight,” said Adam Humbert, owner of Jerico’s Mile, a sports bar in Upland. “Each girl is paid $100 whether they win or lose, and the winner of the championship fight receives an additional $50.”

All women fighting use red and gold oversized gloves and go three rounds instead of the usual 12. The ring is a smaller version of a professional boxing ring with red and blue corners for each fighter.

The women have their own entrance music and have a “manager” in their corner to consult with between rounds. Attire for the women is up to each fighter; some wear creative clothes while others wear warm-up pants or exercise shorts and work-out tops.

No boxing event would be complete without the proper stage name. Some of the ULV competitors include: Liz “Trinity” Lucsko, Elisha “Booty-Licious” Mckinney, Christine “Luscious Lanna” Lewis, Amanda “Stealth” Thomas and Sarah “Poison Ivy” Hoisington.

The women who compete take the event seriously.

“I’m a little nervous, but I’m confident,” said first-time-fighter Mckinney. “All the girls really get into it, but it’s a lot of fun.”

As they enter the ring, each warms up her own way. Some pace, some do jumping jacks and others watch and wait.

As the music blared on the night of Feb. 20, out came the first fighters – Lucsko, a veteran, fighting new-comer McKinney. When the bell rang, both women entered the ring swinging. In the end, the judges awarded Lucsko a unanimous victory.

After the four preliminary fights came the championship fight. Challenger Hoisington faced reigning champion Amber Clayton. It was billed as the best fight of the night. Both women seemed determined and intimidating. The week before, Clayton took the title from previous champion Crystal “Diamond” Marks, and was determined to hang on.

As the names were announced, the crowd went into a frenzy.

When the first bell rang, both fighters went into full-force action. Both delivered strong hits to the other’s head and body, trying to wear the other down.

The biggest surprise came at the end of the first round as Clayton swung hard enough to knock down Hoisington, but she was not down for long. She got back up with a vengeance. As they went at it, the bell rang, and both retired to their corners.

In the second round, fatigue was apparent in both women as they delivered exhausted blows to gain points.

With encouragement from their respective corners, each fighter used everything she had to finish round three.

As the fight ended, the crowd cheered for whom they believed won. In the end as the scorecards were read, “26-30,28-30, 28-30,” the winner by unanimous decision was Clayton.

ULV onlookers appeared to enjoy the event as much as the contestants.

“I think it’s great; it’s fun to go to and hang out with your friends and have a good time on a Thursday night,” said senior Rey Lopez.

As interest in the event grows, new college faces appear in the crowd. Students from as far as Cal State San Bernardino and Chapman University came to find out what the hype is all about.

“In the beginning I thought I was going to get a lot of negative feedback, but I have gotten the complete opposite.” Humbert said. “More and more girls are becoming interested, and that’s great. My goal is to keep giving something for the students to do, since there is not a lot to do around here.”

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