Freshmen prepare for first college finals week

Freshman Garrett Lough is focused on his two heaviest classes for finals week, business math and English. “I overloaded this semester,” Lough said. / photo by Sylvia Castellanos
Freshman Garrett Lough is focused on his two heaviest classes for finals week, business math and English. “I overloaded this semester,” Lough said. / photo by Sylvia Castellanos

by Amby Sarabia
Assistant Editor

Although midterms are over, finals are just a week away, and for some students there just is not enough time to cram it all in.

Many returning students have a specific study regiment by which they tend to abide, but for new freshman the finals load can become overwhelming.

Freshman Irene Beltran is anxious about the week to come, as she tries to decide what she needs to study and how she plans to do it.

“I know I plan to study in the library,” she said. “There are just too many distractions in my dorm room,” referring to the distractions of the television set, radio and computer. The dorms will be quiet during finals week, as quiet hours will be enforced.

“There is so much more that I could be doing rather than studying,” she said.

Studying for finals is a first for Beltran as she hardly put time aside to study for finals in high school.

Jessica Baker, freshman, needs to do really well on her biology and math finals, she said. For Baker, finals week is “different than I thought it would be.” / photo by Sylvia Castellanos
Jessica Baker, freshman, needs to do really well on her biology and math finals, she said. For Baker, finals week is “different than I thought it would be.” / photo by Sylvia Castellanos

“I’ve got a lot more going on now,” Beltran said, “ I work two jobs.”

Learning to balance school, work, friends and time for oneself is something each college student must learn to handle.

“These are my first college finals,” Beltran said. “I just have to see how it goes.”

Finals for freshman Emily Roberts is not as stressful. Carrying 17 units, Roberts feels confident that she has already reviewed the information needed for her classes.

“Midterms were no problem and I am in good standing in all my classes,” Roberts said.

Roberts does plan to review her notes until she feels confident enough to take a break.

“I plan to study in my dorm since all my stuff is already here,” Roberts said.

Studying in the dorm should be the perfect environment for many residents since all their supplies and items they usually use to study with, such as radios, are within reach.

German Jimenez, freshman, has only to worry about his college algebra class for finals week, he said. Jimenez said his finals week is “pretty laid back.” / photo by Sylvia Castellanos
German Jimenez, freshman, has only to worry about his college algebra class for finals week, he said. Jimenez said his finals week is “pretty laid back.” / photo by Sylvia Castellanos

Also, Resident Advisors are to ensure that residents have the quiet time they need.

“I will definitely be ensuring that quiet hours are kept in my hall,” Stu-Han R.A. Desiree Quintero said, “so that everyone in the hall has an opportunity to get in study time.”

For some, studying in the comfort in their dorm is necessary to performing well during a test.

“I need to listen to music when I study,” Beltran said.

If residents begin to feel overwhelmed during finals week or are just looking for some helpful advice, the R.A.s are available to them, a service many residents are sure to use if the week becomes too hectic.

“I will be available to my residents if they need any help or have any concerns,” Quintero said.

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Journalism operations manager at the University of La Verne. Production manager and business manager of the Campus Times.

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