Professor brings chemistry to lecture

Greg Beran, assistant professor of chemistry at UC Riverside, presents his research, "Molecular Crystal Polymorphism: Can We Predict How Molecules Pack Together in Solids?" in the Science Seminar class May 1. One example Beran used was chocolate bars. Cocoa butter has six polymorphs, the most desirable being Metastable Form V, which has a glossy appearance, is crisp and melts at 34 degrees Celsius. Cocoa butter is more stable in Form VI, in which the chocolate is dull, soft, has a grainy taste and often turns partially white after it changes into Form VI. / photo by Katherine Careaga
Greg Beran, assistant professor of chemistry at UC Riverside, presents his research, “Molecular Crystal Polymorphism: Can We Predict How Molecules Pack Together in Solids?” in the Science Seminar class May 1. One example Beran used was chocolate bars. Cocoa butter has six polymorphs, the most desirable being Metastable Form V, which has a glossy appearance, is crisp and melts at 34 degrees Celsius. Cocoa butter is more stable in Form VI, in which the chocolate is dull, soft, has a grainy taste and often turns partially white after it changes into Form VI. / photo by Katherine Careaga
Katherine Careaga
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