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‘Curatorial Studies Selects’ community art

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Jasmine Martinez, senior architecture major at Mt. San Antonio College, explains the design of one of her three projects to George Assenelli, parent of one of the other artists, at the “Curatorial Studies Selects” show Monday in the Arts and Communications Building. The exhibit featured work by local artists and students who were selected by the Curatorial Studies class. Martinez used balsa wood, foam and adhesive to recreate the UNESCO laboratory in Vesima, Italy for her piece “UNESCO Laboratory, West Section Cut.” She liked the steps of the laboratory, as it represented a step into a sustainable environment. / photo by Jolene Nacapuy

Jasmine Martinez, senior architecture major at Mt. San Antonio College, explains the design of one of her three projects to George Assenelli, parent of one of the other artists, at the “Curatorial Studies Selects” show Monday in the Arts and Communications Building. The exhibit featured work by local artists and students who were selected by the Curatorial Studies class. Martinez used balsa wood, foam and adhesive to recreate the UNESCO laboratory in Vesima, Italy for her piece “UNESCO Laboratory, West Section Cut.” She liked the steps of the laboratory, as it represented a step into a sustainable environment. / photo by Jolene Nacapuy

Sierra Dasher
Staff Writer

The University of La Verne’s curatorial studies class hosted an exhibit featuring a variety of different artists’ work with varying styles Monday in the Arts and Communications Building Studio.

Catalina Lopez, senior English major, Danelle Assanelli, senior art major, and Candace Garlow, senior biology major, are three ULV students who curated the “Curatorial Studies Selects” exhibit and chose specific local artists to be highlighted.

Many of the artists were present at the exhibit and were able to discuss with the visiting students and faculty about the inspiration behind their pieces.

“I think it’s a plethora of good things, and it’s absolutely brilliant and I really like the hyperrealism in Candace’s paintings,” Robert Oshodin, junior art major, said.

Garlow included some of her own artwork in the exhibit, and also decided to choose some pieces that were done by her family members.

“Each of us had (a) different inspiration and we started off on the basis of who do we know around us,” Garlow said. “Some of the art is by my grandparents and one is by my aunt, so that’s the next generation down, and there are also two by my cousin, so mine turned into a family theme.”

Her grandparents, Frederick Ganschow and Virginia Ganschow, contributed a beautiful landscape, a portrait of Garlow’s mother and aunt, and an oil painting of a woman in a suit called “Basic Suit.”

Another featured artist Jasmine Martinez, a senior architecture major at Mt. San Antonio College, brought in a unique architectural style of art.

One of her pieces was inspired from a case study she did of a building on a slope in Vesima, Italy called “UNESCO Laboratory, West Section Cut.”

The building model is made of balsa wood and cut open on the side, so viewers are able to see into the structure and design of the piece.

Another popular piece was the “Subtraction” and “Collision” model she created from foam, which illustrated contrasting forms and ideas.

“The method of this one is ‘Subtraction’ so you start with a cube, and it’s just a cube, and you just hack away at it,” Martinez said.

“The point was to subtract from it and still know it was a cube.”

“The other method is called ‘Collision’ so there are three base objects and they just collided together to form one uniform mass,” she said.

Lopez also contributed some of her own artwork to the exhibit, such as the “End of Twilight,” portraying a variation of vivid colors.

“I wanted to experiment with violet and yellow because on the color wheel they are the opposites, so they are complementary,” Lopez said.

“I (also) wanted to add an extra black so it looks like it’s almost like a galaxy or you’re in a portal and the yellow is trying to seep out.”

“So that one is up to everyone’s interpretation, someone said it looks like you’re coming out of the water or you’re going to heaven, or there are meteors trying to hit each other,” she said.

Lopez said each of the curators for the exhibit brought in their own work and found other artists from different schools and areas, so there were a variety of styles.

“We were looking for art that were from things that we’ve never learned (in) this class,” she said.

“It’s cool to see how we can compare our artwork with theirs and see a wide range of art coming together,” she said.

Sierra Dasher can be reached at sierra.dasher@laverne.edu.

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