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Slow down with Snapchat

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Many use Snapchat, one of the biggest forms of social media among many today, on a daily basis with fun and wacky filters such as face swapping, face compression, flower crowns and even a dog filter. There are also geo-tags to let people know where they are, the time and how hot or cold it is. However, the speed filter, which tells users how fast they are traveling when they take the photo, has caused quite an uproar.

Wentworth and Karen Maynard of Georgia are suing Christal McGee, 18, and Snapchat for negligence, after McGee hit their car while using the Snapchat speed filter, leading to serious injuries. McGee said in a statement that it is targeted at both because “Snapchat should know the filter has dangerous implications and they should take responsibility to act reasonably to take steps to eliminate risks associated with their products.”

However, Snapchat has no control over when people choose to use their app and should not be sued. It can be used by runners or passengers, but it does not have “dangerous implications,” unless the user is irresponsible.

McGee was driving at 11:15 p.m. Sept. 10, 2015, with her friends and wanted to reach 100 miles per hour on the speed filter. She was distracted by the app and hit Wentworth Maynard’s car at 107 miles per hour. In a statement, McGee’s passenger said she hit 113 miles per hour and reached to post it, prior to hitting the car. This erratic driving was a poor decision on her part.

McGee and her friends were treated for minor injuries, while Wentworth suffered permanent brain damage and is being taken care of by his family.

While in the ambulance stretcher, McGee had the nerve to post a selfie on Snapchat saying “lucky to be alive,” showing her obsession with the phone app.

Last month, Snapchat made a “Do NOT Snap and Drive” filter, shown when users choose the speed filter, to discourage people from using it while driving.

The Maynard’s should only be suing McGee, because it was her actions that caused the accident. Just because that filter is there, does not mean she was forced to use it, especially while she was behind the wheel. McGee should have been smart enough to know not to use her phone while driving, and should take full responsibility for the accident and damage she caused to the victims.

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