Main Menu

Local artists demonstrate eclectic talent

Twitter
Visit Us
INSTAGRAM
Artist Robert Butler, who said he finds inspiration from other’s stories, creates landscape paintings Saturday at the Claremont Art Walk. During his second summer in the Claremont Packing House, Butler asked passersby for their opinions on his work. The Claremont Art Walk, held 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., the first Saturday of each month, showcases a variety of art exhibits throughout the Claremont Village. The next Art Walk will be Oct. 1. / photo by Taylor Bolanos

Artist Robert Butler, who said he finds inspiration from other’s stories, creates landscape paintings Saturday at the Claremont Art Walk. During his second summer in the Claremont Packing House, Butler asked passersby for their opinions on his work. The Claremont Art Walk, held 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., the first Saturday of each month, showcases a variety of art exhibits throughout the Claremont Village. The next Art Walk will be Oct. 1. / photo by Taylor Bolanos

Celene Vargas
Editorial Director

Jazz art, “shock slogans” and perfectly-timed landscape displays made up this month’s Claremont Art Walk, Saturday at the Claremont Village.

Local galleries such as the Claremont Community Foundation, SPACE and Bunny Gunner featured a diverse range of art and drew crowds of people of different ages.

The Claremont Community Founda­tion attracted an early audience with Richard Allen May III’s display, “Improvisa­tions: Art Inspired by Music.”

“Music brings back so many memories that inspire me,” May said. “Being an art student and also having played the alto saxophone when I was in high school, it just kind of came together.”

From portraits and jazz prints to abstract, he said every piece in his collection displayed a different part of his development as an artist.

“I was really trying to learn how to draw faces because faces and hands are the hardest thing for an artist to really master,” May said about his self-portrait done using charcoal with a blue background. “My goal is to become a master artist in faces and hands.”

May also had a wall of jazz prints made using woodcuts. He sketched, then carved the images into the wood, put ink on it and topped it with paper before he ran it through a press. He said it was a long process, but one he enjoyed.

“Music is about life, and my art is about life,” May said.

At the SPACE Gallery, Jaime Munoz’s show, “Systems,” greeted people with the smell of incense and art with religious images.

“His art reminds me of punk music,” said Dan Ossandon, who is currently staying in Fullerton. Ossandon met Munoz about four years ago at Chaffey College and specifically attended the art walk to see his recent work.

“I’ve been a fan ever since,” Ossandon said.

Munoz had drawings with grid backgrounds and religious symbols, like the prayer hands, and a message. The message for the prayer hands one read, “Who is the slayer? Who is the victim? Speak!”

The drawings and paintings seemed rudimentary at a distance with its black and white palette and bold lines. However, the closer one got, the more details became evident. One such drawing was of a cross that, upon closer inspection, was made by drawing a mechanical device with levers and pedals. The slogan for that piece was, “Get Well Soon. Yes Sir, I Will.”

“It’s crazy what he does and how much patience he has to make his style,” Ossandon said.

What seemed to really capture people was a nature landscape by Steve Comba at the Bunny Gunner Gallery. His largest painting was hanging in front of the window, so when viewed from outside, the window seemed to frame it.

“I based my selections on the space available, and what I could do to show certain works,” Comba said. “The idea of putting a painting on the window that you could only see at night is perfect for that painting because it’s a night scene.”

The mostly purple-­hued painting was a depiction of the Claremont foothills looking toward the valley.

All of Comba’s pieces were nature landscapes with vivid colors that played with the element of light.
“The art is distillations of moments, but it’s all about the light of landscape, always has been,” Comba said. “This is the way I see the world.”

The Claremont Art Walk is held on the first Saturday of each month.

Celene Vargas can be reached at celene.vargas@laverne.edu.

Twitter
Visit Us
INSTAGRAM

, , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.