Professor explores nanoscience

Ricardo Morales, associate professor of chemistry, shares his findings in his lecture “Tales From Nano: What We Can Learn From This Tiny Scale.” In this lecture, Morales tells his audience about the new chemical and physical properties in nanos, particles that are one billionth times smaller than a meter, and how they can improve our lives, such as its use in medicine. / photo by Janelle Kluz
Ricardo Morales, associate professor of chemistry, shares his findings in his lecture “Tales From Nano: What We Can Learn From This Tiny Scale.” In this lecture, Morales tells his audience about the new chemical and physical properties in nanos, particles that are one billionth times smaller than a meter, and how they can improve our lives, such as its use in medicine. / photo by Janelle Kluz

Joshua Bay
News Editor

Ricardo Morales, associate professor of chemistry, presented his recent research “Tales From Nano: What We Can Learn From This Tiny Scale” Tuesday in the President’s Dining Room.

Morales, who received his doctorate in chemistry from UC Riverside, was introduced by Professor of Chemistry Iraj Parchamazad.

“From the beginning, Ricardo has shown that he’s the kind of faculty La Verne needs,” Parchamazad said.

Morales began by outlining his topics: the significance of nanoscience, its application in the real world and how it affects magnetic and bimetallic systems.

Nanoscience is the study of atoms, molecules and objects whose size is on the nanometer scale. A nanometer is a one-billionth of a meter. For example, a water molecule is less than one nanometer.

Morales explained how nanoparticles can offer opportunities for the improvement of chemical reactions and processes. Physical and chemical properties of materials change when the size is decreased to the nanometer range. This is an important factor in Morales’ work.

The lecture later transitioned to discuss the National Nanotechnology Initiative, or NNI, a federal government program for science, engineering and technology research for nanoscale projects.

Morales pointed out how ferromagnetic nanoparticles has gained interest in recent years by the NNI.

Ferromagnetic nanoparticles are a class of nanoparticles that are preferred for medical diagnostics and drug delivery.

It is because of this that the study of nanoparticles can heavily influence cancer research.

As his presentation came to a conclusion, Professor of Psychology Aghop Der-Karabetian asked Morales for clarification as the floor was opened to questions.

“As a psychologist, would nanotechnology help with brain functioning?” Der-Karabetian asked Morales.

“Most of my research is for cancer,” Morales responded to Der-Karabetian. “It’s possible for the future.”

Joshua Bay can be reached at joshua.bay@laverne.edu.

Correction
The original photo caption for the story “Professor explores nanoscience” (Dec. 9) incorrectly described nanoparticles as being “a substance one billion times smaller than atoms.” Nanoparticles are actually particles that are one billionth times smaller than a meter. The Campus Times regrets the error.

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