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Movie Review: ’11/9′ critiques new political climate

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https://lvcampustimes.org/2018/09/11-9-critiques-new-political-climate/

Mark Acosta
Editor in Chief

Nov 9, 2016, marked a turning point in American history with the election of Donald Trump as president.

“Fahrenheit 11/9” is documentarian Michael Moore’s latest film which takes the viewer on a journey through a variety of topics, all of them having to do with the presidency of Donald Trump. 

Moore sheds light on the current political climate and how we, as voters, can steer our moral compass in a different direction than in the past years.

Moore places blame on Trump, the Republicans and their followers for heightened racism, lack of gun control, an increase in school shootings, the prevalent abuse of women and the negligence of the First Amendment right to freedom of the press.

But Republicans are not his only targets.

Moore also attacks the Democratic party and former president Barack Obama for their own failures as well. 

However, he fails to really take a look at both sides of the political spectrum. Instead, Moore continues throughout the movie to deeply criticize the Republican party. 

The film opens with multiple takes of different news footage of citizens predicting there would be no way Trump would actually win the Republican nomination. We all know how that turned out.

From Trump’s win, Moore then catalogues the failure of the electoral college, as well as Hillary Clinton’s failure at winning the presidency, despite winning the popular vote.

In the middle of the movie, the best part of the film, Moore takes the audience back to his hometown of Flint, Michigan. 

This is where Moore unravels the timeline behind the city’s ongoing water crisis.

Moore places responsibility on Republican Gov. Rick Snyder for most, if not all, of the blame. Snyder repeatedly told the community that their water was safe to drink, but Moore uncovers the systemic cover-up leading people to believe that they could drink the water from the Flint River instead of the fresh water from Lake Huron. 

This led to the widespread lead poisoning of thousands of adults and children, as well as numerous deaths in Flint.

Toward the end of the film, Moore likens Trump to Adolph Hitler.

He does this not to say that the two are the same overall, but to caution people of how Hitler once rose to power. 

This leads the film into quickly profiling the new faces of Senate challengers, most of whom are minority candidates who talk about how they are trying to be the new face of change. 

Two hours is a long time to sit through a documentary-style film, but Moore makes this easy to do by giving the audience a wide range of topics and associating them with larger ideas. 

I like the way the film flows – Moore does not stay on one topic for too long and transitions smoothly from one to another.

The main point of the film is to highlight that if we do not take our elections seriously, we will continue to get candidates like Donald Trump. 

Mark Acosta can be reached at mark.acosta@laverne.edu.

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