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Harris Gallery exhibit evokes ‘Secret Garden’

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Nina Foyabo, sophomore sociology major and Jesus Ramirez, sophomore world languages major, interpret Gary Brewer’s painting Ultraviolet Memory at the Harris Gallery’s “Secret Garden,” reception Tuesday. The exhibit runs through Oct. 24. / photo by Melody Blazauskas

Nina Foyabo, sophomore sociology major and Jesus Ramirez, sophomore world languages major, interpret Gary Brewer’s painting Ultraviolet Memory at the Harris Gallery’s “Secret Garden,” reception Tuesday. The exhibit runs through Oct. 24. / photo by Melody Blazauskas

Liliana Castenada
Staff Writer

Guests were drawn in by the colorful atmosphere and the intricate art pieces at the Harris Gallery’s “Secret Garden” exhibit, which had its opening reception Tuesday.

Sculptures sat in the center, while paintings adorned the white walls.

The 12 pieces in all, six paintings and six sculptures, created the feeling of a garden of sorts.

Artist featured in the exhibit were Rochelle Botello, Gary Brewer, Jason David, and Rema Ghuloum.

“Rochelle Botello’s sculptures seemed to be growing these various sorts of organic forms … blossoming with color and full of joy,” said Dion Johnson, gallery director, who added that it was the combination of works in this show that gave him the idea for its name.

David’s wood sculptures contributed to the secret garden with twisty tree-like features taking unpredictable turns.

The paintings of Brewer and Ghuloum complimented each other with color schemes of dark hues mixed with light.

Ghuloum’s oil paintings gave the exhibit a distorted perspective of reality, creating a background that seemed to suck the audience into a whole different dimension. By combining different colors and textures of paint, the painter created the impression of a black hole – though a colorful one.

Brewer paintings added orchids to the Garden; with the detail of veins in the flower petals, his piece felt realistic and simultaneously like a space creature.

Botello’s sculptures made from duct tape, wood and cardboard resembled flowers or plants blooming from a soft pillowy texture to fierce angles, with vibrant, alluring colors reminiscent of real foliage.

“I was very glad that not everything was black and white, or picture-perfect, things are very abstract and just very different,” said Nina Foyabo, a sophomore sociology major who attended the reception.

The exhibit run through Oct. 24 in the Harris Gallery. The gallery is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Liliana Castaneda can be reached at liliana.castaneda@laverne.edu.

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