Keskin considers therapy preference

Yesim Keskin, assistant professor of psychology, discusses effective psychotherapy practices in women and Latinx subjects during her lecture Tuesday in the Executive Dining Room. / photo by Danielle De Luna
Yesim Keskin, assistant professor of psychology, discusses effective psychotherapy practices in women and Latinx subjects during her lecture Tuesday in the Executive Dining Room. / photo by Danielle De Luna

Yesim Keskin, assistant professor of psychology and fieldwork coordinator, discussed effective psychotherapy practices and preferences in her lecture titled, “Contextual Factors Associated with Psychotherapy Preferences and Experiences,” in the Executive Dining Room Tuesday.

Keskin conducted surveys among University of La Verne psychology students to gather and categorize data to determine what factors make the psychotherapeutic process ‘helpful’ or ‘unhelpful’ for clients.

Keskin said the study revealed an overwhelming preference for a therapist who is warm, empathetic, understanding and engaging.

Keskin said this is correlated to a general dislike for psychotherapeutic methods in which the therapist primarily analyzes and imparts knowledge to their client as an authority on mental health.

The study also revealed that men and those who lean politically conservative, struggle with treatment stigma hindering the psychotherapeutic process.

This data aligns with previous research from the project’s literature review which found that men are more likely to suffer from treatment stigma than women, Keskim said.

Respondents were primarily female and Latinx, but included a range of students between the ages of 21 and 30, both those who had and had not sought treatment previously and their answers were analyzed qualitatively, Keskin said.

The quantitative results are still being processed and will be added to the study.

—Danielle De Luna

Latest Stories

Related articles

Interfaith ideas connect health care providers and patients

Megan Granquist, director of the athletic training program and professor of kinesiology, presented “Interfaith and Health Care” on Tuesday in the Quay Davis Board Room to roughly 30 people.

Lecture looks at leadership’s downside

Rich Whitney, professor of organizational leadership, presented  “Leaving leadership: The process of moving through point person to past person," Tuesday in the Quay Davis Board Room before an audience of roughly 20.

Mahdavi discusses rise in human trafficking

University President Pardis Mahdavi discussed “Tripping through the Tropes of Trafficking,” as this year’s speaker for the 10th annual Frederick Douglass Human Rights lecture Wednesday in Morgan Auditorium.

Burrel shares personal journey

Alexandra Burrel, associate vice president and chief diversity officer, was speaker for the University’s monthly “What Matters to Me and Why” series on Feb. 15 in the Ludwick Center Sacred Space.