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Cruisin’ La Verne shows off antique, rare cars

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Victoria Tavera
Staff Writer

Streets of Old Town La Verne were closed off for the annual Cruisin’ La Verne Holiday Car Show, where classic cars filled the streets Nov. 23.

The California Highway Patrol hosted its annual booth “CHiPs for Kids” where people donated toys for children in need as Christmas presents since the holidays are coming around. 

This event is hosted by the California Highway Patrol and is part of an annual holiday event “CHiPs for Kids” where people can donate toys for children in need. 

Mike Ludaking, Glendora resident, brought his 1962 Oldsmobile F-85 to the show and shared how he found it in the high desert. 

Ludaking said the car had been sitting in the dessert for about 40 years. He said that restoring it took a long time and took even longer before he was able to even operate the car. 

“I’ve been coming as a visitor for quite a few years and decided to actually be in the show this year,” Ludaking said. “It’s a great event with a lot of great people for a good cause.”

Hundreds of people crowded the streets and many stayed and sat by their car. There were around 40 cars on display. 

Many businesses stayed open, which allowed guests of the car show to have a variety of food to eat.

John Duran, La Verne resident, brought his 1950 Mercury Monterey, which was originally owned by his family. He said it took him about three years to restore the car and make changes to it. He recently just moved to La Verne and wanted to participate in the community, he said.

“I just wanted to bring it out and share it with the fine people of La Verne,” Duran said.

Gary Sykes, trades worker for the residence halls at the University of La Verne, said the cars are always changing.

He said that last year there were cars all the way down to the police station and this year may have had less, but still had a great variety of cars.

“I think it’s a great annual event, the cars are always spectacular,” Sykes said. “I love the Chevelles, that’s what my passion is, they’re great classic cars.” 

The 94.7 radio station “The Wave” hosted a booth where they played music during the event. 

Jim Sostanza, Monrovia resident, said his 1935 Chevy Master took him about six years to restore because the parts were so rare.

“My favorite part of this event would have to be seeing all my friends,” Sostanza said.

Victoria Tavera can be reached at victoria.tavera@laverne.edu.

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