Clubs gather to promote sustainability and environmentalism

Pedro Isao Mori
Staff Writer

The Campus Activities Board hosted an Earth Day event with the aim to educate people on how to be more environmentally friendly at the Abraham Campus Center on April 22.

The event featured 10 different clubs and organizations presenting things such as recycled art and compost while also offering activities like pot painting and seed planting. 

The International Student Organization had a booth inspired by “The Lorax” and students could plant seeds in hopes of growing fruits and vegetables. 

“Today we are here for Earth Day gathering all together for a higher purpose beyond us,” said club president Lucine Karapetian, senior economics major. “We wanted to do something that gave back to the plants and the Earth. How we can give back to the ecosystem and it can give back to us because we can become one with nature.”

The event had roughly 20 people on the first floor looking at the displays and taking part in the activities. They were welcomed by CAB who handed out tote bags to promote the use of reusable bags instead of plastic bags when people go out shopping.

Lambda Alpha Anthropology Honors Society presented information about how people could be making composting at home. Roughly 30% of all food bought in the United States ends up going into the trash eventually, according to the club’s display. Instead of throwing this away people could turn this into compost which serves as a source of nutrition for plants when they grow. 

A project that drew a lot of attention was Clear Future, an integrated business program by students who are business majors at the University. They sold a two-in-one screen cleaner and handed out seed bombs for students, which would bloom flowers when planted. Their supplier is partnered with the company One Tree Planted, which is committed to global reforestation. They achieve this by planting a tree with every single order.

“All the profits go to School Meals, a local charity based in Southern California,” said Clear Future CEO Gabriela Suasty. “Helping children living in homelessness get a proper education, giving them free tutoring and mentorship that they just can’t afford at the moment.” 

Multiple booths offered items for students to take home. 

One booth featured a clothing drive where students could bring in an item in exchange for one offered on the table. Furthermore, students painted flower pots, learned how to plant seeds using biodegradable pots and received seed bombs that could be put anywhere with flowers eventually blooming from them. 

“I liked that they have different options to explore (for sustainability) and they’re handing out these cute tote bags. It’s always fun to come out and hang out with friends,” said freshman kinesiology major Isabella Quiroz.

Pedro Isao Mori can be reached at pedro.mori@laverne.edu.

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Pedro Isao Mori, a freshman journalism major and business management minor, is a staff writer for the Campus Times.

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