Students mark the Jewish holiday of Sukkot

Cantor Paul Buch from Temple Beth Israel in Pomona, right, leads music that celebrates the traditions of Sukkot inside the Sukkah that was built outside of the Ludwick Center on Oct. 7. Sukkot is a seven-day celebration of the gathering of the harvest and commemorates the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt. / photo by Kim Toth
Cantor Paul Buch from Temple Beth Israel in Pomona, right, leads music that celebrates the traditions of Sukkot inside the Sukkah that was built outside of the Ludwick Center on Oct. 7. Sukkot is a seven-day celebration of the gathering of the harvest and commemorates the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt. / photo by Kim Toth

Stephen Gilson Jr.
Staff Writer

Tikkun Olam International hosted a service and “Sleepover Under the Stars” in honor of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot outside the Ludwick Center on Oct. 7.

The day began early that morning with the building of the sukkah, which is a temporary shelter typically constructed out of branches and other natural materials. 

The sukkah construction is part of the weeklong celebration of fall festival Sukkot, which commemorates the sheltering of the Israelites in the wilderness.

Joachim Marcus Gratz de Lang, junior interdisciplinary studies major, shakes the lulav and etrog under the direction of Cantor Paul Buch, from Temple Beth Israel in Pomona, in the Sukkah outside of the Ludwick Center on Oct. 7. The tradition of shaking the lulav – a bouquet made up of palm, myrtle, and willow branches – an etrog – a citrus fruit similar to a lemon that is native to the Mideast – is part of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, a seven-day celebration of the gathering of the harvest that commemorates the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt. / photo by Kim Toth
Joachim Marcus Gratz de Lang, junior interdisciplinary studies major, shakes the lulav and etrog under the direction of Cantor Paul Buch, from Temple Beth Israel in Pomona, in the Sukkah outside of the Ludwick Center on Oct. 7. The tradition of shaking the lulav – a bouquet made up of palm, myrtle, and willow branches – an etrog – a citrus fruit similar to a lemon that is native to the Mideast – is part of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, a seven-day celebration of the gathering of the harvest that commemorates the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt. / photo by Kim Toth

“(Today) a sukkah is generally a place where you go with your community to relax, eat, play music, and talk,” said Tikkun Olam International president and junior interdisciplinary studies major Joachim Gratz de Lang.

The evening’s festivities began at 4 p.m with about 15 community members – of various religious traditions. 

Cantor Paul Buch of Temple Beth Israel in Pomona led an informal service by sharing the story of the holiday, playing guitar and singing songs. 

“The Israelites were enslaved by the Egyptians,” Buch explained. “Once the Israelites were freed, they trekked through the wilderness and wandered for 40 years… Moses led them to the borders of the land that God promised them. Then Moses died and the Israelites moved on without him. 

“Building the sukkah is meant to commemorate the time that the Israelites spent wandering the wilderness during those 40 years,” Buch explained. 

“Keeping traditions is a way to keep in touch with each other,” said Reed Gratz, professor of music, who attended the event. “It is about community engagement – one of our values here.”

When the program ended, members of the club camped out in the sukkah they’d constructed.

Stephen Gilson Jr. can be reached at stephen.gilson@laverne.edu

Other Stories

Stephen Gilson Jr. is a sophomore journalism major with a concentration in broadcast journalism. He played baseball and football in high school and is an avid sports enthusiast.

Other Stories

Kim Toth is a junior photography major and a staff photographer for the Campus Times and La Verne Magazine. Her work can be found in Instagram at @kim_t_photos and @kimberlytothphotos.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest Stories

Related articles

Clark considers University’s Brethren influence

Al Clark, professor of humanities, presented a lecture called “Brethren Heritage at ULV: 129 years of Shifting Interpretations” as part of the weekly La Verne Academy Lecture series at noon Tuesday at the Quay Davis Executive Board Room. 

Identities and histories preserved with ofrendas

A profound overview of Dia de los Muertos was followed by the construction of the altars or ofrendas on Oct. 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Ludwick Sacred Space. It was presented by Jose Miguel Hernandez, a junior educational studies major, and Christian Bracho, an associate professor of  teacher education. 

Trotter shares recent work, reflects on ULV career

Ruth Trotter, professor of art history emeritus, who retired earlier this year after more than 30 years at the University, delivered her final faculty lecture titled “Recent Work: My Last Lecture” to an audience of about 30 students and faculty on Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Board Room.

Holocaust survivor shares life story

Holocaust survivor Gabriella Karin returned to the University of La Verne on Sept. 22 to share her story and her art to about 40 students and faculty members in the Campus Center Ballroom. The lecture was hosted by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life and the Tikkun Olam club.