Ceramic exhibit explores German culture

“Knight and Maiden” by Villeroy and Boch is featured at the American Museum of Ceramic Art’s “A Traveler’s Guide to Mettlach: Villeroy and Boch” exhibition in the Robert and Colette Wilson Gallery. This piece is an ewer-shaped vase with etchings. / photo by Amanda Torres
“Knight and Maiden” by Villeroy and Boch is featured at the American Museum of Ceramic Art’s “A Traveler’s Guide to Mettlach: Villeroy and Boch” exhibition in the Robert and Colette Wilson Gallery. This piece is an ewer-shaped vase with etchings. / photo by Amanda Torres

The exhibition, “A Traveler’s Guide to Mettlach: Villeroy and Boch,”  is on display at the American Museum of Ceramic Art through June 30, 2025, in the Robert and Colette Wilson Gallery. 

Jean François Boch and Nicolas Villeroy founded their ceramics company, Villeroy and Boch, in 1836. They used ceramics as a creative medium to document everyday life in the 1800s in Mettlach, Germany. 

The exhibition features work that reflects German cultural experiences, societal interpretations, and mythology in nine display cases.

With a variety of artwork in the exhibition, the works featured on tile and vases portray the idea of love and harmony. 

One tile piece in particular, “Dutch Man and Woman,” shows a man and a woman walking along what looks like a bed of water in black-and-white. 

Another section of the glass cases has a variety of beer steins, which were originally part of a collection donated to the museum by the Wilsons. 

The Wilsons’ collection reached over 3,000 pieces, including steins, beakers, dinnerware, tiles, plates, planters and sculptures. 

The piece “Guardian Angel” is part of the exhibition “A Traveler’s Guide to Mettlach: Villeroy and Boch” at the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona, which runs through June 30, 2025. The pottery production company Villeroy and Boch produced decorative tiles and vases in Germany in the late 19th century. / photo by Amanda Torres
The piece “Guardian Angel” is part of the exhibition “A Traveler’s Guide to Mettlach: Villeroy and Boch” at the American Museum of Ceramic Art in Pomona, which runs through June 30, 2025. The pottery production company Villeroy and Boch produced decorative tiles and vases in Germany in the late 19th century. / photo by Amanda Torres

There were multiple steins and beakers that represented life in Germany, made in the shape of castles or depicting medieval discussions among knights in their suits.

Upon entrance to the exhibit, visitors are greeted with an introductory video discussing the history of Villeroy and Boch.                    

The front of the entrance is a blue wall with the title of the exhibit and a portrait with a view of the town of Mettlach created in 1890 on one side, and an introductory summary on the other. 

To the right of the entrance is a long bright hallway, with plain white walls and illuminated display cases. The deeper into the hallway, less and less of the introductory video can be heard, leaving guests the opportunity to admire and ponder in their own thoughts. 

AMOCA is located at 399 N. Garey Ave. in Pomona. The museum is open to the public from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday. For more information visit amoca.org.

– Brittany Snow

Brittany Snow is a junior communications major with a concentration in public relations and a minor in business management who currently serves as a staff writer for the Campus Times.

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