Burrel shares personal journey

Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer Alexandra Burrel speaks at the “What Matters to Me and Why” lecture series Feb. 15 at the Ludwick Center Sacred Space. Before a large crowd, Burrel emphasized the importance of self-awareness and understanding one's needs to achieve personal fulfillment. / photo by Abelina J. Nuñez
Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer Alexandra Burrel speaks at the “What Matters to Me and Why” lecture series Feb. 15 at the Ludwick Center Sacred Space. Before a large crowd, Burrel emphasized the importance of self-awareness and understanding one’s needs to achieve personal fulfillment. / photo by Abelina J. Nuñez

Anisa Salazar
Staff Writer

Alexandra Burrel, associate vice president and chief diversity officer, was speaker for the University’s monthly “What Matters to Me and Why” series on Feb. 15 in the Ludwick Center Sacred Space. 

“Give me grace,” Burrel began and she told the audience about her love of travel. She has visited 45 states, four continents and numerous countries, she told the audience of roughly 50 community members who attended the talk.

By October of this year she said she hopes to have visited the remaining five states. 

She said her love of traveling and observing the stillness of water is one way that she is able to ground herself. 

Burrel’s father was the minister of her hometown church until he died in 2009. She said she and her family learned from him through watching, loving and appreciating what he did for them. She said she is rooted in love and continues to hold on to his words, “It’s all in the plan,” as she continues her journey. 

“Am I giving at the wrong place at the wrong time,” Burrel said she asked herself. She said that over time she has learned that not every room or space is for her, and that it is OK to pick and choose when and where she gives her energy.

Burrel referred to the Bible verse, “For the spirit God gave us does not make us timid but gives us power, love, and self-discipline,” as a way to remind herself that one can have self love and peace. 

In 2015, Burrel said she wrote a blog about the importance of setting aside time for yourself and not filling all empty space or time with something like watching TV.  She said that once she was able to establish it was okay to have “me time,” she began to acknowledge her value. 

“I can control me when I know who I am,” Burrel said. 

When asked to be a part of this series, she said she knew how important it was and how sharing her story may help others, but she had to build up the courage as being vulnerable in front of an audience is a difficult task. 

“It was a good way to see how someone has navigated meditation and grounding,” said Julissa Espinoza, director of civic and community engagement. “It was a good road map of what she’s done to ground herself.”

The next speaker in the “What Matters to Me…” series is Krystal Rodriguez-Campos, director of the justice and immigration clinic in the College of Law. Her talk will be March 14.

Anisa Salazar can be reached at anisa.salazar@laverne.edu.

Anisa Salazar is a freshman communications major with a concentration in public relations and a staff writer for the Campus Times.

Abelina J. Nuñez, senior journalism major, is a photography editor for Campus Times and staff photographer for La Verne Magazine. She previously served as LV Life editor, arts editor social media editor and staff writer. In Fall 2023, Nuñez was La Verne Magazine's editor-in-chief and was previously a staff writer as well. Her work can be found on Instagram @abelinajnunezphoto.

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