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Assistant Professor of Public and Health Administration Nikki Shipley explains current living conditions for chronic and newly homeless people on Los Angeles’ Skid Row. Once homeless people get off the streets, they can begin to take care of themselves, including focusing on finding work and taking charge of their health care, Shipley said. Shipley’s talk, “There’s No Place Like Home:A Model for Reducing Homelessness,” Tuesday was part of the weekly faculty lecture series. / photo by Janelle Kluz

Professor dispels myths about homeless

Audience members filled out surveys identifying their role models, important people in their lives, and activities that are important to them and possessions that hold value for them. Nikki Shipley, assistant professor of public and health administration, instructed everyone to cross out one item on each list.

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Jack Meek, professor of public administration, presents his lecture “Metropolitan Systems and Networks as Complex Adaptive Systems” Monday in the President’s Dining Room for the faculty lecture series. Following Meek’s lecture, Kevin Marshall, professor of law; Marcia Godwin, associate professor of public administration; and David Chappell, associate professor of physics, contributed to the topic by explaining rules for innovation, innovative cities and complex patterns. / photo by Emily Bieker

Los Angeles studied as a complex web

Jack Meek, professor of public administration, discussed the issues of complex systems in cities and analyzed his recent research on the topic in the faculty lecture “Metro­politan Systems and Networks as Complex Adaptive Systems” Monday in the President’s Dining Room.

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Assistant Professor of Public Administration Soomi Lee demonstrates a graph during her faculty lecture in the President’s Dining Room Monday. Lee’s research focuses on the effect of the supermajority vote requirement for tax increases in California. She earned her doctorate in economics and political science from Claremont Graduate University in 2011. Lee teaches quantitative research methods, data analysis and microeconomics analysis for public policy. / photo by Megan Peralez

Supermajority affects property tax

Assistant Professor of Public Administration Soomi Lee discussed the effects of supermajority vote requirements on taxes during her lecture “The Effect of Supermajority Vote Requirements for Tax Increase in California: A Synthetic Control Method Approach” Monday in the President’s Dining Room.

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