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Writers Archives: Cortney Mace

Jeffrey Chun, junior business administration major; Margaux San Nicolas, junior international business and language major and Isabelle Cheng, senior educational studies major, present their honors senior project on safe sex May 11 in the President’s Dining Room. Chun holds their senior project sign “#TookThePledge” for students who take their pledge on putting their bodies first and practicing safe sex. At the end of the semester the students will put the pledge sign photos together to create a final artifact.

No glove, no love

Jeffrey Chun, junior business administration major; Margaux San Nicolas, junior international business and language major and Isabelle Cheng, senior educational studies major, present their honors senior project on safe sex May 11 in the President’s Dining Room.

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Tuesday May 8th, ASULV sponsored a Karaoke Night in La Fetra for students who live on campus. The event included free chicken strips and beverages to performers and audience alike. Singing to the Disney movie Moana "You're Welcome" by Dwayne Johnson, Junior Theater major, Joseph Baum, got fully into character and added a dance routine to his performance. / Cortney Mace

Karaoke goes Disney

Junior theater major Joseph Baum gets into character during his dance performance to “You’re Welcome” from Walt Disney’s “Moana” at ASULV’s Karaoke Night Tuesday in LaFetra Lecture Hall.

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Lawrence Potter, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, discusses “colorism,” a social divide between lighter-skinned and darker-skinned African Americans, Monday in the President’s Dining Room. Potter considered a debate between W.E.B Du Bois and Marcus Garvey on colorism, a phenomenon that disadvantages darker skinned African Americans. Potter says that modern day colorism persists because media has created a beauty standard and superiority for lighter skin and Caucasian features.

Potter tackles intraracial prejudice

Lawrence Potter, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, explained the notion of the “color line,” or “colorism” within the African American community, otherwise known as intraracial prejudice between light skinned and darker skinned African Americans, Monday in the President’s Dining Room.

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