Montana research lab offers opportunities for students

Pablo Weaver, associate professor of biology and director of the Montana Field Station, shares the research he and his students conducted on the effects of human pollution on bird populations Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Board Room. His research confirmed that environmental changes create a chance in the behavior of wild birds. / photo by Drake Ingram
Pablo Weaver, assistant professor of biology and director of the University’s Montana Field Station, shares the research he and his students conducted on the effects of human pollution on bird populations Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Board Room. / photo by Drake Ingram

Joslyn Aguilar

Staff Writer

Assistant Professor of Biology Pablo Weaver discussed his work and research opportunities at the University of La Verne’s  Bob and Mary Neher Montana Research Station during a lecture Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Board Room.

About 20 community members attended the talk titled “Current Research and Opportunities at the Neher Montana Research Station.”

Weaver also talked about the state of Montana.

The University’s Montana site in Drummond, Montana, is made up of a few properties, the Magpie Ranch, Clark Camp and Baldy Base, Weaver said.

Montana is home to the Richest Hill, a popular tourist sight, that held 1 billion tons of materials such as gold, silver and copper. 

Mining of these precious metals have brought pollution to the surrounding areas and rivers in Montana, he said.

Students who attend research trips of various lengths of time are able to work on their own research projects as well as some of the already on-going student-led projects, Weaver said.

Current student-led projects are focused on the behaviors of cowbirds, small birds native to the area, and on metal pollution in the land surrounding the Clark-Fork River.

Anyone from the University of La Verne community is welcome to stop by the ranch if they are in the area, Weaver said.

For more information on the Bob and Mary Neher Montana Research Station, contact Weaver at pweaver@laverne.edu.

Joslyn Aguilar can be reached at joslyn.aguilar@
laverne.edu.

Related articles

Lecture focuses on food and culture

Gail Tang, associate professor of mathematics, gave the final “What Matters to Me and Why” lecture of the year, for which she discussed the meaning of community and its relevance to culture, food, and history.

Professor considers remote learners’ needs

Valerie Beltran, professor of teacher education, discussed her research on “Meeting the Needs of Students Enrolled in Online Classes” Tuesday in the Quay Davis Board room before an audience of about 20.

Professor presents bacteria benefits

Stacey Darling-Novak, professor of biology, gave a presentation about the benefits bacterial endophytes can provide growing seeds and the process of studying them.

Interfaith ideas connect health care providers and patients

Megan Granquist, director of the athletic training program and professor of kinesiology, presented “Interfaith and Health Care” on Tuesday in the Quay Davis Board Room to roughly 30 people.
Exit mobile version