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Dear Editor,

Jacob Leveton may prefer to criticize the administration for certain inadequacies on some issues [“Letters to the Editor,” Oct. 1]. Though I would say that students are no different when it comes to heavier thought-provoking issues and would rather think about their “own world” and keep their eyes on La Verne. This is just a fact of life, sadly. In a time when we have a major presidential election, the status of the economy in debate, health care in question, and not to mention a war on terrorism and in Iraq, some would rather talk about how you can find zombies and how great zombie movies are [“How to recognize a real zombie,” Oct. 1]. What is worse, our campus “Rock the Vote,” was like a “Rock the Lunch.” Everyone did what they usually do – eat lunch and listen to music. To some credit, sure 10 or so registered to vote, some learned about the brand new National Coming Out Day, and also listened to KULV and got free stuff. However, there was no forum whatsoever: a discussion of important issues, even issues that are important to our generation. The college vote, even on a local level, were not addressed in a forum. I think even MTV would feel disappointed, and deserve more credit than before.

Rich Uranga
Senior

Dear Editor,

I have two objectives in this letter. The first is a response to Dr. Merritt’s letter last week [“Letters to the Editor,” Oct. 8]. Simply put, there are always examples which can be used for both sides of any argument. Just as he explains that he knows of two students who mentioned to him that they were very happy they took Core classes. I assure you that for every student he knows who appreciated that they took the Core classes, I can find another student who can tell me that they didn’t learn a single thing from the classes. In fact, I might even be able to find the same number of students who did not graduate on time because they either couldn’t get into the Core classes they needed, or had to retake one due to disinterest in the class. A good advisor would be able to make recommendations for a student which might open their mind to new ideas. I have taken a few classes in areas which I didn’t think I would be interested in. I even picked up a minor in an area I had never taken a class in prior to my stay here at ULV. The question is not whether it is good for some students, it is whether the classes are good for the majority of the students at this University. I’m sure Dr. Merritt will agree with that.

My second objective is to point out another disservice to not only the students at this University (of which the gross majority are of legal voting age), not only the citizens of this state, but the citizens of this country. Many citizens watched the presidential debates of the past two weeks and paid close attention to how the candidates responded to questions and what sides they took on specific issues. Unfortunately, not all of the candidates were actually heard on the issues. In fact, not all of the candidates will be listed on the ballot in California in November. I know that this paper has made a dedication to covering issues related to the upcoming election, and hope that one of those issues is related to the leading third party candidate, who’s running mate appeared on another ballot of ours just earlier this year.

Some may say that voting for a third party candidate is simply throwing a vote away. For me, this will be my first presidential election, and I feel most comfortable voting for the candidate who I feel best represents my views, even if that candidate doesn’t have a fair chance of winning. Isn’t that what a democracy is all about?

Jacob Leveton
Senior

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