Lecture focuses on mentorship during pandemic

Assistant Professor of Management William Luse, lectures about “Mentorship and the Transition to Remote Work During Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic” Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Boardroom. He talked about how students did not know what to do, and it was the time where many students saw the opportunity to change their majors or career paths. / photo by Nareg Agopian
Assistant Professor of Management William Luse, lectures about “Mentorship and the Transition to Remote Work During Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic” Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Boardroom. He talked about how students did not know what to do, and it was the time where many students saw the opportunity to change their majors or career paths. / photo by Nareg Agopian

Assistant Professor of Management William Luse discussed “Mentorship and the Transition to Remote Work During Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic” before an audience of about 30 Tuesday in the Quay Davis Executive Board Room. 

“My interest in this topic came from my co-author Dr. Chantal van Esch,” Luse said. “She in many ways is an expert in mentorship and I’ve always been curious about the topic.”

The research for this lecture was done using a total of 430 participants from 8-10 countries. Those in the research included K-12 teachers, faculty members of the University and other professionals.

Within the research, there were concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic and how it compared to other pandemics of the past, including reasons for mentorship during the pandemic, self-efficacy and the experience of mentors.

Understanding the experience of mentors was crucial to the research as knowledge and expertise affected the outcome of those mentored.

Luse highlighted issues that arose between mentors and their mentees as a result of the pandemic and differences by gender.

When asked what his biggest challenge was, Luse said pandemic itself made it challenging to recruit participants for the study. 

—Angel Isioma Oparah

Angel Isioma Oparah is a staff writer for the Campus Times and a sophomore journalism major with a concentration in broadcast journalism. In her free time, she enjoys reading and writing blogs.

Nareg Agopian is a staff photographer for the Campus Times and La Verne Magazine.

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