Butts investigates Davenport food

Sophomore Josh Sherod (right) volunteered to be the subject for Eddie Butts’ senior project, concerning nutrition and the body. Over a three-month period, Sherod will be fed three diets, including a high-fat diet and a low-fat diet. Blood samples will be taken and Sherod’s blood pressure will be monitored every other week for changes. / photo by Amy Borer
Sophomore Josh Sherod (right) volunteered to be the subject for Eddie Butts’ senior project, concerning nutrition and the body. Over a three-month period, Sherod will be fed three diets, including a high-fat diet and a low-fat diet. Blood samples will be taken and Sherod’s blood pressure will be monitored every other week for changes. / photo by Amy Borer

by Jennifer Gross
Staff Writer

While some seniors choose senior projects to simply satisfy their graduation requirements, Eddie Butts has chosen a project that could possibly help the world; if not the world then maybe people who eat Davenport Dining Hall’s food will benefit.

The biology student has chosen to battle the complex issue of nutrition. In his experiment, Butts will show differences in the affect eating has on the human body using two separate diets, specifically concentrating on Davenport Dining Hall’s food. According to Butts, Davenport offers both high and low fat food choices.

The study will take place over a three month period beginning in January and concluding in March. The experiment will consist of three diet cycles, each cycle lasting one month. The subject of this test will be sophomore Josh Sherod who volunteered to be a part of the project.

“I really appreciate Josh doing this,” said Butts. “He’s putting himself out on a limb for me.”

The first month of the experiment will be the control period diet where high and low fat foods will be compared. The second month will be the low-fat/low-food chain diet, or the vegetarian diet and the third will be the high fat diet, or the fast food/junk food diet.

According to Butts, Sherod will be instructed as to what he must eat at each meal, this includes all foods and liquids.

In addition to the diets, Sherod will have blood drawn twice each week throughout the three month study. The blood samples will then be analyzed for triglycerides and lipid metabolites. Also, Sherod will be tested at various times for subcutaneous body fat using a water apparatus at the Mount San Antonio College Wellness Center. This test is a method for determining the amount of overall body fat.

General energy levels, stress, and sleeping patterns will also be compared during the study.

According to Butts, the experiment should not affect Sherod’s health too much.

“He will feel differently from the high fat diet than from the low fat diet,” said Butts. “I predict he will feel sluggish and not have much energy.”

Butts estimates that the cost of the project will be approximately $1200. The money would be used for analyzing the blood work, buying extra food, and for film to photograph Sherod’s changes. Butts is seeking donations to help fund his project.

“The Environmental Club has contributed $200,” said Butts. “They have been very supportive.”

Butts came up with his project idea because of his interest in food and nutrition. After graduation, he plans to enter Loma Linda Medical School to become an emergency room physician.

“I hope through the experiment to be able to see the significance of the effects food has on the body,” said Butts. “I’m hoping to find something that I’m not looking for.”

Butts feels that the results of his project will be significant to ULV students who eat Davenport’s food. “It’s important they know how the food is affecting them.”

For questions regarding Butts senior project, contact him in Brandt Hall (909) 392-6400 #6139 or at his mailbox #552.

Jennifer Gross
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Amy Borer, Features Editor
Amy Borer
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