Sage blessing ceremony cleanses La Verne community

Dan Kennan, adjunct professor of sociology, cleanses Trevor Thomson, a member of the Karuk Tribe of California, with wing and sage in preparation for a sage blessing ceremony Sept. 10 at the Ludwick Center. The California White Sage used in the ceremony grows outside the Ludwick Center and is considered sacred by the local indigenous community. / photo by Darcelle Jones-Wesley
Dan Kennan, adjunct professor of sociology, cleanses Trevor Thomson, a member of the Karuk Tribe of California, with wing and sage in preparation for a sage blessing ceremony Sept. 10 at the Ludwick Center. The California White Sage used in the ceremony grows outside the Ludwick Center and is considered sacred by the local indigenous community. / photo by Darcelle Jones-Wesley
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Darcelle Jones-Wesley, a senior photography major, is photography editor of the Campus Times. Her work can also be found at photographybydarcelle.com.

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