Tongva honored in sage gathering

With a sage bundle and eagle feather in each hand, Dan Kennan, adjunct professor of sociology, sages the students and faculty who attended the sage gathering and blessing event April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. White sage plants have been planted in front of the Ludwick Center in homage to the Tongva people, the original caretakers of the land occupied by the University. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
With a sage bundle and eagle feather in each hand, Dan Kennan, adjunct professor of sociology, sages the students and faculty who attended the sage gathering and blessing event April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. White sage plants have been planted in front of the Ludwick Center in homage to the Tongva people, the original caretakers of the land occupied by the University. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
The necessities for the sage collection were laid out on the red blanket April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. Tobacco is used to give back to the white sage plants, after asking for permission from the sage. The drums are used in the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as the sage bundles for the blessings. A dozen students and faculty attended for the blessings and healings of the sage April 12 outside of the Ludwick Center. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
The necessities for the sage collection were laid out on the red blanket April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. Tobacco is used to give back to the white sage plants, after asking for permission from the sage. The drums are used in the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as the sage bundles for the blessings. A dozen students and faculty attended for the blessings and healings of the sage April 12 outside of the Ludwick Center. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
After picking the sage, participants tie it in red thread to make their bundles. Sage caretaker Maria-Elena Cardeña recommended allowing the bundles to dry out for a couple weeks. The indigenous practice of burning sage is meant to cleanse areas, expel out bad energy and encourage wisdom and healing. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
After picking the sage, participants tie it in red thread to make their bundles. Sage caretaker Maria-Elena Cardeña recommended allowing the bundles to dry out for a couple weeks. The indigenous practice of burning sage is meant to cleanse areas, expel out bad energy and encourage wisdom and healing. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
Maria-Elena Cardeña beats a drum and sings along with Director of Multicultural Affairs Daniel Loera during the closing ceremony of the sage gathering and blessing April 12 outside the Ludwick Center. Cardeña is the caretaker of the University’s sage plants. After receiving sage blessings, participants had the opportunity to trim the bushes and gather their own bundles of sage. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
Maria-Elena Cardeña beats a drum and sings along with Director of Multicultural Affairs Daniel Loera during the closing ceremony of the sage gathering and blessing April 12 outside the Ludwick Center. Cardeña is the caretaker of the University’s sage plants. After receiving sage blessings, participants had the opportunity to trim the bushes and gather their own bundles of sage. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
Participants wrap their bundles of sage in crimson yarn, with help from Adjunct Professor of Sociology Dan Kennan, after gathering it April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. The optimal time to prune the sage plants is after the full moon in March. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
Participants wrap their bundles of sage in crimson yarn, with help from Adjunct Professor of Sociology Dan Kennan, after gathering it April 12 in front of the Ludwick Center. The optimal time to prune the sage plants is after the full moon in March. / photo by Sheridan Lambrook
Sheridan Lambrook

Sheridan Lambrook, a senior journalism major with a concentration in visual journalism, is photography editor and a staff writer for the Campus Times.

Comment

Latest Stories

Related articles

Lecture focuses on food and culture

Gail Tang, associate professor of mathematics, gave the final “What Matters to Me and Why” lecture of the year, for which she discussed the meaning of community and its relevance to culture, food, and history.

ULV awards those who illustrate core values

The Spirit of La Verne Awards are given to students, faculty and staff members who embody the University of La Verne’s core values.

Zionism panel teaches students about world issues

The University of La Verne’s Office of Religious and Spiritual Life hosted a Zionism discussion with Jonathan Reed, professor of philosophy and religion, and Jason Neidleman,  professor of political science, in the Ludwick Center last week.

La Verne brings Black community together

The Office of Multicultural Affairs invited all Black undergraduates, graduates, alumni, faculty and staff to a brunch featuring food from Day Day’s BBQ and Waffle House in Pomona.