‘Fire and Ice’ glamorizes formal in old Hollywood

Madison Orange, a glow light dancer from the Dancing Fire, performs at the Fire and Ice Winter Formal last Friday. The Dancing Fire, located in Hollywood, offers a variety of classes ranging from belly dancing to fire dancing. In addition, they offer DJ services. For the rest of the night, Madison showed off her dancing skills on the side of the dance floor as students continued to dance. / photo by Michelle Leon
Madison Orange, a glow light dancer from the Dancing Fire company, performs at the Fire and Ice Winter Formal last Friday. The Dancing Fire, headquartered in Hollywood, offers a variety of classes ranging from belly dancing to fire dancing. In addition, the company offers DJ services. For the rest of the night, Orange showed off her skills on the side of the dance floor as students continued to dance. / photo by Michelle Leon

Erum Jaffrey
Arts Editor

University students and guests shimmied themselves to the dance floor at this year’s winter formal, “Fire and Ice” Friday night at the grand Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood.

Hosted by the Campus Activities Board, about 150 people attended the classy formal in the blossom room, where the first Academy Awards took place in 1929.

“We were looking at banquet halls in the Los Angeles and Hollywood area and the (Roosevelt) hotel turned out to be a really good place for us,” said Savannah Torres, sophomore public affairs major and CAB major events chairwoman.

The ballroom fit the “Fire and Ice” theme effortlessly, with a 25-foot hand-crafted ornate red-lit ceiling, red velvet chairs and white tree centerpieces with blue rock candy. Small scattered diamonds on black tablecloths added to the old Hollywood look.

“We just wanted a contrasting idea (for the theme) so we chose blue and red and put that together,” Torres said.

The lively night included a build-your-own slider bar, round-the-clock hors d’oeuvres, go-go dancers and a photo booth.

The DJ played popular music from a balcony in the ballroom, as go-go dancers twirled illuminating hoops, nunchucks and glow sticks.

“My favorite part was dancing because it brings all the students together,” said Shari May Alonzo, sophomore biology major and CAB multicultural chairwoman.

The ambience of the venue was classic and elegant. The Hollywood Roosevelt hotel was built in the late 1920s in Spanish colonial revival style, indicative of the lavish chandelier in the main lobby and double-hung windows.

Not only does the hotel have a bowling alley, but it has a cabana and a tropicana bar as well, overlooking a million-dollar pool.

The multiple bars and restaurant in the hotel were packed on Friday, bringing in an older crowd. Hollywood is known to host strange people, as a man dressed as the queen of England was roaming around the hotel lobby, almost entering the formal.

Other than the dance floor, the photo booth was the second most popular place to go, as a long line of hyped students were ready to take silly photos with various props.

“There are a variety of props to chose from like the bunny ears and mustaches, and people are really enjoying the props,” Alonzo said.

For some students, this was their first time attending the formal.

“It reminds me of high school in a good way,” said Stephany Huynh, sophomore business major.

“I didn’t think college would have these things. We can still be kids and have fun,” she said.

With midterms around the corner, events like this give students the opportunity to de-stress with their friends.

“This is a great way for everyone to relax and have fun and take a break from the stress of school,” Huynh said.

Students had the option of driving to the hotel themselves for $15 valet parking (as com-pared to the $40 base price) or pay $5 for a bus trip from ULV to the venue.

The winter formal is an annual CAB event. Each year brings a new theme and new students looking to have fun.

“It’s all about having a good time and looking forward to college memories for students to have,” Torres said.

Erum Jaffrey can be reached at erum.jaffrey@laverne.edu.

Michelle Leon

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