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Lecture envisions future of books

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https://lvcampustimes.org/2015/12/29895/
Eight year partners in research, Librarian Erin Gratz and Associate Director of Learning Technology Nori Barajas-Murphy discuss eAuthoring in education during their lecture, “Faculty eAuthoring: A Taxonomy,” held in the President’s Dining Room Tuesday. Their research showed that e-textbooks authored by faculty could cost significantly less than traditional books. / photo by Terrence Lewis

Eight year partners in research, Librarian Erin Gratz and Associate Director of Learning Technology Nori Barajas-Murphy discuss eAuthoring in education during their lecture, “Faculty eAuthoring: A Taxonomy,” held in the President’s Dining Room Tuesday. Their research showed that e-textbooks authored by faculty could cost significantly less than traditional books. / photo by Terrence Lewis

Arielle Torrez
Staff Writer

Associate Director of Learning Technology Nori Barajas-Murphy and Web and Instructional Technology Librarian Erin Gratz discussed how students engage with textbooks in their “Faculty eAuthoring: A Taxonomy,” presentation Tuesday in the President’s Dining Room.

Their research began with their fascination of new technology with the release of the Kindle and iPad. Murphy and Gratz discussed the concept of faculty published textbooks and how they can benefit both faculty and students.

The two created a hierarchy of the use of the textbook in the classroom beginning with a custom textbook put together by an instructor including only certain chapters that will be covered throughout the course.

The discussion of the hierarchy continued mentioning Compiled Resources, Curated Resources, e/Authored Textbooks, e/Authored Interactive textbooks, and eAuthored responsive books.

“This concept is important for faculty to think about because it gives them the opportunity to have their students reading something that they specifically want which aligns with their curriculum directly,” Gratz said.

The e/Authored textbook is completely written by a faculty member and available on iBook. This form of textbook would match the text identically with the content of the course itself.

“If you find a textbook that is highly interactive this makes it easier to annotate, highlight and take notes in a digital format,” Murphy said. “When it comes to writing and research everything is readily accessible.”

They discussed that an eAuthored textbook would be much cheaper for students to purchase. They mentioned the importance of making college affordable and how an idea like this can help in doing so.

“I think that faculty written textbooks are beneficial to students because it is more interactive and helps students by more visual and interactive learning,” sophomore educational studies major Melissa Lach said.

The presentation ended with a discussion of the future of the textbook. The eAuthored responsive textbook is something that has not been done yet, but they see happening in the near future. An eAuthored responsive textbook is a digital textbook that is capable of adapting text for a student based on their responses. The book would deliver text in a different form for a better understanding until the student mastered the content.

“If the faculty member is more engaged, the student will become more engaged. If there is excitement and passion coming from the faculty then that also builds the student’s excitement,” Gratz said.

Arielle Torrez can be reached at arielle.torrez@laverne.edu.

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