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City officials impede, postpone Benefit Show

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by Deanna Reyes
Staff Writer

What may have been viewed as a struggle between city concerns and students’ desires seems to be now merely an issue of bad timing and miscommunication.

The Associated Students Federation (ASF) Forum sponsored Benefit Punk Show, which was scheduled to take place tonight, has been postponed indefinitely.

The event, which was the brainchild of sophomore Chris Jones and ASF, would have helped the Union Rescue Mission in Los Angeles by donating canned food, the would-be admission for the concert. Jones had scheduled bands such as Long Fellow, The Line, Off the Record, Rudiger, Never Heard of It and Slimer to perform at tonight’s event.

According to Kim Reed, an ASF senator and coordinator of the show, the postponement is an inconvenience because the bands might not be available for a future concert date. Since Jones and ASF had already been granted approval from ULV administration, they had advertised and made promotional efforts, that now seem to have gone to waste.

“The nature of the event is different from anything the University has ever had before. I can understand the concern of the city since they don’t have anything to relate it to,” said Reed. “We’re sort of revolutionizing with this event.”

Jones said he speculates that a city official logged onto the Volcom website, where some of the bands scheduled to perform had advertised the concert, saw a picture of the Warped Tour and “freaked out.”

“I’m mad,” said Jones, “because we were all ready to have the show. It was miscommunication that caused it to be shut down. I can understand their [the city’s] point, but it’s not going to be as big as they think. It’s not like these guys [the bands] are the freaking Rolling Stones or anything.”

Jones said they were notified this past Thursday that they would not be able to hold the concert in the Wilson Library parking lot as scheduled. He said a meeting was held with city officials to discuss the event.

“At first the city thought it was going to turn into a rave and feature heavy metal bands,” said Reed. ” Now they’re saying it’s a crowd control issue.”

The show planners, according to Reed, are now required to make a presentation to the city council about the event they wish to hold. La Verne citizens will then be notified of the event and given the opportunity to voice their support or concern about the event to the city council, which will then make its final decision regarding the concert. Reed said they also need the support and approval of the La Verne police and fire departments.

“It might be an overreaction by the city,” said Reed. “They’re afraid something may happen that they don’t want to deal with.”

A concern about the type of music has also upset students at ULV. Some have felt that since the music featured will be punk, city officials are stereotyping that kind of music with a certain atmosphere.

Chief Ron Ingels of the La Verne Police Department disagrees and said he feels the music selection holds no relevance in the postponement of the concert. Ingels said that different music however, brings in different crowds.

“There’s going to be a difference if you bring the Philharmonic here compared to punk bands,” he said. “It’s my responsibility to look out for the safety of the city and citizens.”

According to Jones, the punk bands are excited to be involved with a benefit show that helps with social change.

According to Martin Lomeli, city manager for La Verne, obtaining a permit for any outdoor event is a necessary and standard procedure, and that the coordinators of the event requested a permit too late. He said that an event like the concert will be making noise that will effect the business owners and residents of La Verne.

Chief Ingels said that the city needs at least three weeks notice to get everything in order for events such as this. In order to get a permit, an event must be approved by the police and fire departments, the city planners and the city council. Chief Ingels said he was not given enough notice to process everything before the next city council meeting.

“In any kind of event that can impact the neighborhood, the neighborhood must be notified about the event and have the option to go to the city council and express their support or opposition to it,” he said.

Chief Ingels said the coordinators of the event probably did not know a permit was needed for this type of event. He said the University called the city to notify them of this event, and were then informed a permit was required. His main concern is making sure there is proper security and police at the event.

“We want to do the first one right so there’s no negative impact,” he said. “We want to make this a positive thing and our goal is to help them do that. I anticipate that this will be approved by the council.”

Jones said the event is definitely not cancelled, and that they hope to hold the concert sometime next month. “It seems like they want to work with us,” he said.

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