Two University of La Verne regional campuses set to close

The University of La Verne’s Oxnard campus is one of the two regional campuses phasing out in-person instruction and seeking to end their lease agreements. The other is the High Desert regional campus in Victorville. / photo by Christine Diaz
The University of La Verne’s Oxnard campus is one of the two regional campuses phasing out in-person instruction and seeking to end their lease agreements. The other is the High Desert regional campus in Victorville. / photo by Christine Diaz

Two of the University of La Verne’s regional campuses will close as part of the University’s cost-cutting measures, university officials announced earlier this month. 

The University’s High Desert Regional Campus in Victorville and the Oxnard Regional Campus will phase out in-person instruction and its students will be served through online classes and programs, after a significant decrease in enrollment.

“Essentially it is important for us to – in light of the COVID pandemic – allocate our resources to students who can use it the most right now,” Provost Jonathan Reed said.

This decision came after consultation by Reed, Chief Financial Officer Avo Kechichian, Vice President of Enrollment Management Mary Aguayo, and the directors at both regional campuses.

Students at these campuses, most of whom are adult learners, will be able to continue their classes online or have the option to attend nearby La Verne campuses where similar programs are offered.

Faculty members and students at these campuses were made aware of the University’s decision.

Each student will be given an individualized program to help ensure they graduate on time, said Reed.

As for faculty at these campuses, no full-time faculty will be laid off or fired from this decision, said Reed.

–Alondra Campos

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Christine Diaz
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