Student provides creative platform

Tyler Faye Anderson, junior speech communication and philosophy major, founded Unidentifiable Creative, an online content company. Anderson said she empowers individuals to trust their creativity and make it a livelihood, not just a hobby or side job. She manages the agency, which gives mainstream artist easier access to the content that she creates for them. The website contributors include a fashion designer, graphic artist, rapper and screenplay writer. / photo by Sara Flores
Tyler Faye Anderson, junior speech communication and philosophy major, founded Unidentifiable Creative, an online content company. Anderson said she empowers individuals to trust their creativity and make it a livelihood, not just a hobby or side job. She manages the agency, which gives mainstream artist easier access to the content that she creates for them. The website contributors include a fashion designer, graphic artist, rapper and screenplay writer. / photo by Sara Flores

Ashley Mubiru
Staff Writer

Junior speech communication and philosophy major Tyler Faye Anderson designed Unidentifiable Creative, a content creation company dedicated to helping artists who cannot limit their art and ideas to one medium, showcasing their work and connecting them with endorsements, sponsorships and collaborations through online and social media promotion.

The website name, Anderson said, represents the eclectic nature of its content.

“It’s a term that encompasses everything we’re about,” Anderson said.

Unidentifiable’s artists work in a variety of media, from painting to sculpture to music, and Anderson does this through creating videos and graphics to promote them.

To encompass this, the header of the site reads: “For the universoul artist.”

“Tyler is a natural born leader (who) can literally figure out anything,” Jedaun Carter said, senior psychology major and friend of Anderson’s.

According to her friends, Anderson is always thinking about her next business venture. She held an event in November 2017 called Backyard Boogie: Creator’s Carnival which allowed local artists to paint and install pieces live as well as showcase their music, poetry and products.

“She is cultivating a space for creatives to showcase themselves … to capitalize off their creativity,” junior creative writing and Spanish major Cheyenne Avila said, who is a poet and spoken word artist and friend of Anderson’s.

The business’ site went up in November 2017 although Anderson began planning Unidentifiable in February 2016.

Unidentifiable works as an agency connecting creatives to opportunities within their fields that allow both the artists and Unidentifiable to profit.

“We specialize in branding so we build portfolios and create for them on other media blogs, sites, and other artists’ pages,” Anderson said.

Some artists featured on the site are graphic artist John Doe, who recycles old skateboards to use as canvases and fashion designer, Z, who creates wearable art intended to raise consciousness.

According to the site, “These are the artists that are multifaceted and want to be known for all of their creativity…For the rappers that are painters, to the models that are writers.”

Anderson said that another aspect to Unidentifiable Creative is mentorship.“Our goal within the next year is to set up creative programs with elementary schools that allow kids to understand that they can choose other routes …to create businesses for themselves (based on) their passions,” Anderson said.

Anderson said that her creations are not solely for her, but for her community.

She said she strives to show her community that they have options, while actually giving it access to them.

Avila said that Anderson provides platforms, visibility, and representation for her community.

“A part of our digital platform and our website is having features for each artist, and they each have different profiles so that you can contact us to get to them,” she said.

Anderson envisions Unidentifiable’s list of creators growing far beyond what she or her team can imagine.

Anderson has always had aspirations of working for herself. She collaborates with different artists, while giving them an audience by advertising their work on Unidentifiable Creative’s website and social media.

“I feel like I’ve always had the spirit of an entrepreneur, but I didn’t really know that it was something I wanted to do,” Anderson said.

Anderson finds herself starting most of her days with to-do lists.

She is often juggling playing the role of the creative director, modeling, and endeavors within her business.

Besides modeling and creative direction, Anderson has her plate full with painting, and poetry as well.

It is all about setting goals and reaching them, Anderson said.

She also has a team of four others who help her along the way, one of which is sophomore English major Christian Nuñez.

Nuñez and Anderson touch base with each other almost every day, making sure they are on the same page regarding projects, reaching out to clients, so that everything is in order.

“Tyler has been everything I could ask for in a partner – diligent, idealistic, ambitious visionary, and understanding,” Nuñez said.

“All of us at Unidentifiable are working our hardest to manifest our best career together, to be multifaceted people. We are intent on making our productivity and creativity work in tandem.”

Anderson believes that collaboration is the essence of her business and leadership style. She is a person that understands effective leadership and focuses on the fact that she must communicate with people.

“Collaboration is showing people that it’s them that can make their dreams happen,” Anderson said.

Anderson said her goal is to see the many different channels included in Unidentifiable Creative someday operate on their own.

Ashley Mubiru can be reached at ashley.mubiru@laverne.edu.

Ashley Mubiru
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