Dyck explains making change is an inside job

Associate Professor of Management Loren Dyck speaks about What Drives Sustained, Desired Change?” Tuesday in the President’s Dining Room. / photo by Claudia Ceja
Associate Professor of Management Loren Dyck speaks about What Drives Sustained, Desired Change?” Tuesday in the President’s Dining Room. / photo by Claudia Ceja

Ashley Mubiru
Staff Writer

Change must come from within an individual. Such was the theme of Associate Professor of Management Loren Dyck’s faculty lecture this week.

“Sustained desired change is change that an individual is longing for,” Dyck said.

Dyck, associate professor of management discussed “What Drives Sustainable, Desired Change?” in the President’s Dining Room Tuesday before 24 students and faculty.

For the lecture Dyck researched how certain people achieve what they want over a long period of time.

He explained that the characteristics of sustained desired change are “relational resonance,” intentionality and emotional engagement.

“Change is an inside job, nonetheless we still need trust in others,” Dyck said.

Trusting relationships are necessary to help, support and encourage each step in the process of change, Dyck said.

He added the first step is asking yourself “Who is it I want to be?” or “What legacy do I want to leave?”

The second step is to ask yourself “Who am I now?” “What are my strengths?”

The third step in this process is establishing a learning agenda determining what we need to learn to achieve what I want.

Dyck said when doctors engage their patients as partners in their own care, they are more responsive to taking care of their own health.

Dyck referred to this as the physician-patient outlook.

Angelica Enriquez, senior anthropology and criminology major, said she resonated with the physician-patient example.

“From personal experience, I have had a lot of trouble with my medical practitioners who didn’t listen to me,” Enriquez said.

Senior education major Gabriel Lazoya said she understood the importance of self awareness and how it is needed to make a difference in society.

“You need to recognize what it is your willing to sacrifice,” Lazoya said.

Ashley Mubiru can be reached at ashley.mubiru@laverne.edu.

Ashley Mubiru
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Claudia Ceja
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