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Safety fair shares emergency tips

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Wayne O’Bannon of Prep and Save shows sophomore business major Jerrol Guidry the various kinds of emergency kits students can keep in the dorms. Prep and Save, located in Upland, sells emergency supplies for many needs and showcased its many products at the University of La Verne’s disaster and preparedness fair Oct. 15 in Sneaky Park. The fair was a part of the Great California Shakeout, an annual event where millions of people across California practice how to “drop, cover and hold on” in case of an earthquake. / photo Kristina Bugante

Wayne O’Bannon of Prep and Save shows sophomore business major Jerrol Guidry the various kinds of emergency kits students can keep in the dorms. Prep and Save, located in Upland, sells emergency supplies for many needs and showcased its many products at the University of La Verne’s disaster and preparedness fair Oct. 15 in Sneaky Park. The fair was a part of the Great California Shakeout, an annual event where millions of people across California practice how to “drop, cover and hold on” in case of an earthquake. / photo Kristina Bugante

Hayley Hulin
LV Life Editor

University of La Verne’s campus safety committee held a safety fair Oct. 15 in Sneaky Park in congruence with The Great California ShakeOut.

Campus and community organizations gathered to share safety knowledge with students. Associated Students of University of La Verne, the La Verne Fire and Police departments, Campus Safety, Housing and Resident Life and others had booths on different safety protocols for disasters or emergencies to encourage safety.

“We are raising awareness on safety,” education department administrative aide and member of the campus safety committee John Gilmore said. “Whether it’s a trip and fall to suspicious activity.”

Each vendor and organization that participated in the fair attended with safety in mind. The ASULV booth had information about the different degree of burns and the transportation department gave samples of dehydrated food.

The ULV transportation department has enough dehydrated food for 2,000 people, said Administrative Assistant Lisa Hansgen.

“I think (the safety fair) brings awareness and makes people think of things they wouldn’t,” sophomore business administration major Rachel Stewart said. “People don’t think about what happens in case of an earthquake.”

Faculty and students showed concern for safety procedures on campus in the event of an on-campus shooting or disaster.

“If there is a shooter on campus, I don’t know what to do,” senior liberal studies major Amy Howland said. “And I wouldn’t know where to go after an earthquake.”

Most students do not know where to gather in the case of an on-campus shooter or disaster, Gilmore said.

“Our Campus Safety could be bigger and more information should go out about what to do for a disaster,” Howland said.

Recent mass shootings on college campuses have some students nervous about the possibility of it happening at ULV.

In an effort to improve safety knowledge, Campus Safety has information on its website, will distribute an infographic poster across campus and uses the LiveSafe app.

“We have the LiveSafe app that we use to alert students,” campus safety dispatcher Quan McCutcheon said. “I’m the one who interacts with people and I’ve seen it work.”

Both Campus Safety and the Campus Safety Committee said that students must alert them of suspicious activity so that people campus wide can be informed of the issue.

“Safety starts with students,” McCutcheon said. “For the most part, I see people leave their personal belongings alone — you must stay alert.”

For more information on staying safe on campus, visit sites.laverne.edu/campus-safety.

Hayley Hulin can be reached at hayley.hulin@laverne.edu.

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