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Society casts ricocheting stones on Clinton

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Araceli Esparza, Editorial Director

Araceli Esparza, Editorial Director

Although a majority of us may seem to grow only more and more tired of the entire Bill Clinton vs. Monica Lewinsky issue, it is important to express some kind of resolution to one of the greatest public ordeals in history.

For the most part, the ongoing details of the situation are really a private matter, but because of our natural curiosity, a great deal of the general public has made the issue a part of their living rooms and repeated conversations. And we wonder why the matter is still continuing, and why the “media” just doesn’t “let it go.”

Well, the media cannot just ignore the matter; especially when some of the people who complain about how overblown this scandal has become still go home and watch the updates of court testimonies. It is these people who further encourage organizations such as the media to disclose more and more information.

Surely, if, from this point forward, we turned off the television whenever anything about Clinton and/or Lewinsky came up, the problem would be resolved and no one would care. But the media is primarily concerned with ratings, and what the public wants to know. Therefore, every time we watch anything relating to the matter we, as viewers, are supporting them.

Don’t get me wrong — defending our president is not the intent. He acted immorally by even pursuing his temptations from Lewinsky. Any person that is dishonest in his or her relationship loses a sense of respect as a person. And the fact that Clinton committed perjury before the entire nation does not make him any more trustworthy.

However, that is not my gripe. My problem is that we are so quick to point the finger at a person of authority simply because that person should be a respectable figure to others. But when thinking about it, those authoritative figures are just as human as any other person deserves to be. They are challenged by the fact that their entire life, actions and thoughts are portrayed through sound waves worldwide, day after day, minute by minute, as often as possible.

Why do we care about what takes place within Clinton’s personal life? Would we treat him any differently if he was a gay president who, rather than having a first wife, had a first lover? His personal life should be kept between his immediate family and not by his American family as a whole.

We should be concerned with his role as a president, such as the fact that he lied under oath, and avoid focusing on the details of what he did as a person. Clinton did not tell truth, and he admitted to that; but we are not resolving the problem by forcing him to embarrass himself further and tell us the details of his affair. That is not the issue at-hand.

If we are so quick to point the finger at the fact that he had this affair in the first place, then we should look at our own lives and reflect on our own wrongdoings. Though our wrongdoings may not be identical to those of the president, I am sure that for some people they are.

If Clinton was to be stoned to death for his actions with Lewinsky, who could honestly say they were perfect — or for that matter, courageous — enough to throw the first stone?

Rather than criticizing or embarrassing Clinton any further, let us reflect on our own imperfections first. Just as we are imperfect, so is Clinton. However, if anyone is ready to continue pointing the finger or judging, then let me be the one to give them the first stone to be thrown at a man who is as culpable of wrongdoings as we are.

Araceli Esparza, a junior journalism major, is editorial director of the Campus Times. She can be reached by e-mail at esparzaa@ulv.edu.

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