Students cope with finals stress

After 10 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, Jason Walker, communications major, finally gets to study after a long day of work, classes and meetings. But he's distracted from “The Radio Station,” his Radio Production textbook. Walker uses the Oaks lounge or the Student Housing Office to study for exams late at night. Finals begin Monday, which leaves him one more full weekend to study. / photo by Sylvia Castellanos
After 10 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, Jason Walker, communications major, finally gets to study after a long day of work, classes and meetings. But he’s distracted from “The Radio Station,” his Radio Production textbook. Walker uses the Oaks lounge or the Student Housing Office to study for exams late at night. Finals begin Monday, which leaves him one more full weekend to study. / photo by Sylvia Castellanos

by Gloria Diaz
Editorial Director

With winter break one week away, the comforts of a break away from school brings music to students’ ears. But before students can curl up on the couch with a warm blanket, final exams must be conquered.

University of La Verne students are feeling the stress of finals as the last week of school fast approaches.

Junior Gerlaine Kiamco said she is under pressure to complete term papers and get ready for her three exams, which are Thursday.

“I wish we didn’t have school for a whole week so we can get ready for finals,” Kiamco said.

“It would be helpful if all the work were spread out. They assigned the papers at the beginning, but they are still due all at the same time,” she said.

This year scheduling permitted two study days allowing students to concentrate on getting ready for finals, which start Monday.

“I think a lot of people will use the two days, because it gives you that time that you wouldn’t otherwise have if you still had to go to class,” said Mary Himes, sophomore. “At the same time, I’m not sure many students will utilize the time to study.”

“I am not going to study on Thursday because I at least need one day to not worry about classes,” said Annie Wypchlak, senior.

There is a feeling among some students that fall 2003 has been a hard academic semester.

Wypchlak, who presented her senior project Tuesday, said that she scheduled this semester to be a difficult one because she knew she “would eventually get senioritis.”

Anxious students are trying to find time to get away from their work. Some find that watching television brings relaxation to a stressful time in the semester.

“I try to do anything but work,” said Delarie Sutton, senior. “I try to go home or talk on the phone with my friends from England.”

Kiamco said that she had to leave her room last weekend because she was so stressed.

“I had to just drop everything for one weekend and have some fun,” she said.

To offer a break from studying, the office of student affairs is sponsoring the Cram Jam breakfast from 8 to 10 p.m. Monday in Davenport Dining Hall.

The event is free, and all students are welcome to attend to take a break from studying and re-fuel with nutritious food. The club or organization to have the highest attendance will win $200.

Journalism operations manager at the University of La Verne. Production manager and business manager of the Campus Times.

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