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Professor of Business Administration Loren Dyck answers questions about his book, “The Impact of Resonance and Dissonance on Effective Physician-Patient Communication in Individual, Relational, and Contextual Dynamics of Emotions (Research on Emotion in Organizations),” to kick off National Library Week. The event took place in Wilson Library Monday in honor of National Book Day. / photo by Katelyn Keeling

Professor of Business Administration Loren Dyck answers questions about his book, “The Impact of Resonance and Dissonance on Effective Physician-Patient Communication in Individual, Relational, and Contextual Dynamics of Emotions (Research on Emotion in Organizations),” to kick off National Library Week. The event took place in Wilson Library Monday in honor of National Book Day. / photo by Katelyn Keeling

Danielle De Luna
News Editor

Six faculty members presented their published scholarly and creative works to the University community Monday in the Wilson Library Lobby in honor of National Library Week.

Ian Lising, associate dean for curriculum, scheduling and student affairs and assistant speech communications professor, spoke about his textbook “The Spin Doctrine,” a project created to supplement a course about spin doctoring in modern society.

“I really wanted to have a clear text that analyzes belief, truth and fact because you have people interchanging them all the time,” Lising said. “Looking at modern examples of spin doctoring also gives us examples of real life applications. Theory is important, but application is more dangerous if you don’t have the right ethics.”

Kimberly Thomson, visiting professor at the center for academic and bar readiness, created a textbook for topics she tackled in her classes like financial crimes and identity theft.
Her book “Crimes Against Consumers” details ways in which consumers can advocate for themselves.

“I covered a lot of this stuff in my intro to criminology classes but there wasn’t a textbook for all of the things I wanted to discuss about consumer advocacy,” Thomson said. “I collected articles from various experts and consolidated the information into an anthology so that it covered a variety of disciplines related to these really important topics.”

Loren Dyck, associate professor of management, published scholarly work extending from his 2008 thesis. His research, spanning 10 years, resulted in his book, “The Impact of Resonance and Dissonance on Effective Physician-Patient Communication.”

“I really wanted medical schools to take a look at the doctor/patient relationship and examine what it takes to establish a positive emotional tone between the two parties,” Dyck said. “To write the book, I used a technique called mind mapping. I’d revisit it over a period of time and tackle pieces of it that I felt were particularly important to me at the time.”

Other faculty members like Diane Klein, professor of law, and Anna Khachatryan, adjunct reading instructor, shared published works that ventured outside of the academic world of textbooks and research.

Klein’s adult coloring book “The Lawyers of Trump-Russia and Their Problems,” began as a series of political illustrations accompanying blog posts about President Donald Trump’s lawyers, but soon evolved into a witty artistic collaboration.

“I teach a class on professional responsibility and I was writing for a blog called ‘Dorf on Law’ about Trump’s lawyers and I had this artist making illustrations for me,” Klein said. “Soon I decided to make the coloring book and I found a letterer who actually used to do the lettering for Trader Joe’s. Coloring books are recommended for stress relief and I thought this would be fun to offer people while we waited for the Mueller report.”

Khachatryan also ventured beyond her professional work to self-publish a poetry collection titled “Haiku and Other Half-truths…”

“This is very different from what I teach,” Khachatryan said. “I work at the La Fetra College of Education, but I have been writing poetry since middle school and I thought, well, if not now, when?”

Support systems like writing groups, colleagues or family are essential to the writing and publishing process, Khachatryan said.

The critique process is accomplished more quickly when aided by fresh eyes and new perspectives.

Danielle De Luna can be reached at danielle.deluna@laverne.edu.

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